Governor Cuomo Issues Consumer Alert To Car Buyers About The Dangers Of Online … – Yeshiva World News

scamnGovernor Andrew M. Cuomo today issued a consumer alert advising New Yorkers to exercise caution when making used car purchases from private sellers over the internet following an increase in the number of complaints about online used car scams received by New York State Department of Motor Vehicles investigators. Each year, these state investigators, working with other federal, state and local officials, recover as much as $1.5 million in stolen vehicles and parts purchased online.

“If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is,” said Governor Cuomo. “Many of the protections afforded to consumers who buy from licensed dealers do not apply to private sales, making the Internet a target-rich environment for fraudsters. I advise all New Yorkers to know the facts and thoroughly research what you’re about to purchase in order to avoid becoming a victim of a scam.”

State investigators receive an average of two dozen complaints per month from across the state, a majority of which are related to online scams. Such complaints led to the arrests of six individuals for engaging in fraudulent vehicle sales in the month of August alone.

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The Department of Motor Vehicles has identified two common used car and online scams:

· Individuals who sell stolen and cars post them online using ads that state they “need quick cash” or are selling the vehicle “before a divorce,” or similar “fire sale” situations. Typically the cars are offered for far below market value or are “cash only” sales, and the titles are counterfeit or belong to a different vehicle.

· Individuals who conceal or alter vehicle ownership documents by covering “brands” on vehicle titles or altering odometer information to conceal alterations to the odometer. Scammers do this to increase the value of the vehicle at the point of sale.

This summer, investigators encountered nearly 20 victims of these types of scams. Individuals arrested in these cases can face criminal charges for forgery, criminal impersonation, criminal possession of stolen property and other felonies.

New York State Department of Motor Vehicles Executive Deputy Commissioner Terri Egan said, “A vehicle purchase is typically one of the largest consumer purchases that an individual makes, so buyers should take some extra time to make sure the car they are buying is a car that can be sold legitimately. Buyers should consider the red flags. If cars are priced very low, if sellers can’t meet you in person or want cash only, and if postings are missing personal information for sellers, take extra caution. I urge everyone to be familiar with the risks of buying cars online.”

Used car scams happen across the state, and are not unique to the internet; scams can happen even if the car is being sold in front of a seller’s house or by a used car dealer. While purchasing a vehicle from a private seller over the internet may be cheaper, there are disadvantages to buying cars online. Private sellers rarely offer a warranty, and if a buyer has a complaint about the vehicle or purchase, they are typically left to resolve the problem with, or take legal action against, the seller. By contrast, the Used Car Lemon Law requires dealers to give consumers a written warranty under which dealers must repair, free of charge, any defect in covered parts.

There are several precautions New Yorkers can take to protect themselves against scammers. When buying a used car online:

· Check for flood damage and evidence that a vehicle has been damaged by a natural disaster. If the vehicle has been exposed to water, over time, parts of the car will start corroding. Check under the carpets, dashboard, and elsewhere for signs of rust or mold.

· Be wary of cars that may have been involved in a serious crash. Look for differing colors or signs of body damage, especially in the engine compartment or trunk of the car. Start the car and make sure the airbag and other warning lights come on and then off to ensure the systems are operating correctly.

· Have the car examined by a qualified mechanic to ensure that the car is safe.

· Don’t pay with cash.

· Make sure that you receive acceptable proof of ownership. If you are purchasing a vehicle in New York State, be cautious if the proof of ownership is out of state title or the prior owner listed is different than the person selling you the vehicle.

· If purchasing a car with a New York State title, the vehicle should not have registration stickers or inspection stickers from another jurisdiction on it.

· Become familiar with the Department Motor Vehicle’s requirements for registering and issuing title certificates for used cars.

· If available, check the vehicle identification number (VIN) against the National Insurance Crime Bureau’s free VINCheck service. A link to this free service is available on the Department Motor Vehicle’s webpage. This will assist in determining if a vehicle has been reported as stolen, but not recovered, or has been reported as a salvage vehicle by coopering National Insurance Crime Bureau member insurance companies.

· Check the VIN with a service that will conduct a complete vehicle history such as CARFAX or NMVTIS.

(YWN Desk – NYC)

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ACCC looking under Chrysler's bonnet over 'lemon' cars – The Sunshine Coast Daily

FIAT Chrysler Australia has agreed to an independent review of customer complaints in a deal with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, but “lemon law” advocates remain unhappy about the process and its narrow focus.

Maroochydore IT professional Aston Wood destroyed his $50,000 Jeep that he says was riddled with faults after failing to get satisfaction from Fiat Chrysler Australia.

In the process he won a Queensland Government commitment to push for national “lemon” laws to protect new-vehicle customers.

Now following the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) investigation into consumer guarantee, complaints concerning faulty vehicles and Chrysler’s handling of those complaints, the car company has agreed to set up a consumer redress program.

Under an agreement, all vehicle fault complaints from January 2013 to December 2014 will be investigated by an independent reviewer.

Fiat Chrysler Australia (FCA) distributes several vehicle brands in Australia including Jeep, Alfa Romeo, Fiat and Chrysler.

Mr Wood describes the outcome as “a little weak” when contrasted with the example set by US and Canadian federal governments.

The US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration fined FCA $105 million and Canada has launched a $5.2 billion lawsuit against the company.

“The ACCC announcement of ‘a slap on the wrist’ makes Australia looks like a laughing stock,” Mr Wood said.

“The consumer guarantees mandate that vehicles will be fit for purpose, free from defects and as durable as a reasonable consumer would expect,” ACCC chairman Rod Sims said.

“Where the guarantee is not complied with, a consumer will have rights against the supplier and in some cases the manufacturer, who will have to provide a remedy.

“This means that all car manufacturers and suppliers, including dealers, need to think beyond the initial sale and invest in their after-sales care.”

FCA customers can agree to have their previous complaints reviewed, with the car-maker committing to implement the remedy recommended by the independent reviewer.

The ACCC will monitor the scheme’s implementation.

Mr Wood is concerned that FCA has been given a further 60 days to do what it should already have been doing and that it, rather than the ACCC, has appointed the “independent” reviewer.

He and fellow lemon law advocates want the ACCC to follow up each customer who lodged a complaint to see if those people have been contacted by FCA. They also want the ACCC to explain the penalties FCA would face for non-compliance.

Affected customers who are not contacted by Chrysler within 60 days should contact 1300 133 079.

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Written by: Bill Hoffman

Buy smart, take caution – Hi-Desert Star

What is the danger of buying a car “as is?”

It means the dealer doesn’t trust the car.  You shouldn’t trust it either.  Often, a car dealer will say, “We’ll take care of the car if it has a problem,” but then “as is” gets written on the contract.  Do not expect them to keep their promise to repair the vehicle.  Read what you sign no matter what has been said!

Won’t the Lemon Laws always protect me?

Not if you buy the car “as is.”  The Lemon Law only applies to vehicles, even used vehicles, that come with a warranty.  

When you buy a car with a warranty, the seller has a “reasonable number” of attempts to make a repair.  If they are unable to do so, they must repurchase or replace the vehicle they sold you under the Lemon Law.

What’s a “reasonable number” of attempts to repair my vehicle?

Over four attempts for the same issue or 30 days out of service for multiple issues within the first 18 months or 18,000 miles is just a presumption the car is a lemon.  Most cars qualify under the Lemon Law because of repairs made after the first year and after the first 18,000 miles.  It’s based on the circumstances, so keep records!

Insist upon getting a Repair Order that states what your complaint was as well as the date.  When you pick up the car, get another Repair Order that tells you exactly what the dealership did to correct your complaint.

What else should I do before I buy a vehicle?

Use Kelly Blue Book to get a price estimate.  In California, you can agree to pay significantly over the Kelly Blue Book value of a vehicle if you are not careful.

Ask questions!  You cannot ask too many questions: “Has it been in an accident? Have you inspected the vehicle? Have you serviced the vehicle? Who was the previous owner? Where did you get the vehicle? Was it ever a rental car?” The dealer has a responsibility to tell you the truth, and they can be held liable under The Vehicle Code if they lie.

Inspect the vehicle. Carfax is great, but you should also have your own mechanic inspect a vehicle before you buy it.  It is worth the roughly $45 to get a second set of eyes on your purchase.

Finally, bring the contract to Legal Assistance.  We are here to go over a contract with you before you sign it.  Always know what you are signing.

This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. If you are in need of legal advice, make an appointment with the Legal Assistance Office at building 1514 or call (760) 830-6111.

© 2015 Hi-Desert Star. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Written by: Written by the Office of the Staff Judge Advocate

Los Angeles Lemon Law Attorney Comments on Ram Pickup Truck Buyback – Military Technologies

    OAK PARK, CA, August 18, 2015 /24-7PressRelease/ — A settlement between the government and Fiat Chrysler last month requires the automaker to issue a buyback offer to the owners of more than 500,000 Ram pickups with defective steering components. The Law Office of Howard D. Silver announced Wednesday that it is prepared to act on behalf of consumers who have incurred undue expenses as a result of the mechanical issues facing these pickup trucks.

“We’re glad that Chrysler is stepping up and paying, but sometimes consumers need assistance,” said principal attorney Howard Silver. “I’m available to help.”

According to the Associated Press, the settlement between Fiat Chrysler and government regulators settles issues stemming from “allegations of misconduct in 23 recalls covering more than 11 million vehicles.” The automaker is subject to a record $105 million civil fine, and must also accept trade-ins or finance repairs for Jeeps with unsafe rear fuel tanks.

The following makes and model years of Ram pickups are included in the buyback:

– 2009-2012 RAM 1500
– 2008-2012 RAM 2500, 3500, 4500, 5500 4×4
– 2009-2011 Dodge Dakota
– 2009 Dodge Durango
– 2009 Chrysler Aspen
– 2008 RAM 1500 Mega Cab 4×4

About the Law Office of Howard D. Silver

Serving clients throughout Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside and Ventura counties, attorney Howard Silver acts on behalf of consumers in a variety of different cases. In addition to protecting the rights of autoMobile owners under California’s Song-Beverly Act, the firm also assists consumers who have been the victim of fraud, identity theft, debt collection harassment and more.

Firm website: http://www.caconsumeradvocate.com/

Social media:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CAConsumerAdvocate
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LawOfficesofHowardDSilverOakPark/posts
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/caconsumeradvocate

Source: 24×7 ALL
Los Angeles Lemon Law Attorney Comments on Ram Pickup Truck Buyback

Source: satPRnews.com
Los Angeles Lemon Law Attorney Comments on Ram Pickup Truck Buyback

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Forks fire chief wants to replace out-of-service firetruck – Allentown Morning Call

A small firetruck that has a tendency to jump out of pump gear and into drive while firefighters are using it has been taken out of service in Forks Township, and the fire chief wants to replace it a few years ahead of schedule.

During Thursday night’s workshop meeting of the Board of Supervisors, fire Chief Bryan Weis said he’d like to replace the department’s brush truck, which is a mini pump truck. It’s off-road capable and is used to fight brush fires and to respond to fires in homes with driveways that are difficult for bigger firetrucks to access.

Weis said the truck has not worked properly since it was purchased 15 years ago and has frequently been out of service for repairs. It’s currently out of service and Weis said he doesn’t want to put more money into it. It was due to be replaced in about five years, but the chief said he’s concerned for firefighters’ safety.

“It has a habit of jumping out of pump gear and into drive,” Weis said. “It can actually move on you when you’re standing beside it. I don’t have the confidence in this truck to pump safely.”

That’s just one of the defects Weis said the department has had with the truck, but it’s the one that made the supervisors agree with the decision to keep it out of service.

Supervisors Chairman John O’Neil questioned why the township didn’t push harder to make the company that provided the truck, Kovatch Mobile Equipment of Nesquehoning, fix the issues while the truck was under warranty.

“We accept stuff that’s sub-par around here, and then have to pay for it later,” O’Neil said. “God forbid we get what we pay for.”

Weis, who has been fire chief a short time and wasn’t in the position when the truck was purchased, said he knows the township made an attempt to work with the township attorney under the Lemon Law, but isn’t sure why nothing was done.

“Now I’m faced with the decision of whether to try and further fix it, when it would be due for replacement in five years anyway,” Weis said, adding that he has been looking at “off the shelf” trucks that would be less expensive — and quicker to get — than a customized unit.

O’Neil questioned why the township spent about $60,000 recently on a commander’s car when the department knew the brush truck needed to be replaced.

“You knew this was coming,” he said to Weis. “You weren’t chief then, so I’m not blaming you. But this is a safety issue on this truck. We should have focused on this first.”

Weis said although about $30,000 of what was spent on the commander’s car came from grant money, he agreed that it could have gone toward replacing the brush truck.

“At the time, though, the truck was running and serviceable,” he said. “And we knew it was scheduled to be replaced soon.”

No formal decisions were made at Thursday’s meeting, although supervisors gave Weis permission to put out bids to sell the existing truck for parts and to continuing looking for a readily available replacement truck.

Christy Potter is a freelance writer.

Copyright © 2015, The Morning Call

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Ledgewood auto dealer fined $693000 for consumer fraud – Daily Record

A Roxbury auto dealer has been fined more than $693,000 for more than 640 violations of consumer-protection laws following legal action brought by the Attorney General’s Office and the State Division of Consumer Affairs.

Superior Court Judge Stephan C. Hansbury, in Morristown, ordered RLMB, Inc., a used car dealership located on Route 46 in the Ledgewood section, to pay $693,645.91 after finding that it violated the State’s consumer protection laws and regulations a total of 640 times. The final default action followed legal action brought by the Attorney General’s Office and the State Division of Consumer Affairs.

RLMB, operating as Bloom Auto Sales, failed to file a response to the complaint, according to a statement released Thursday by Acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman.

The state’s 10-count complaint, filed in March, alleged that RLMB and its manager, Michael L. Bloom Sr., violated the Consumer Fraud Act, motor vehicle advertising and automotive sales regulations and the Used Car Lemon Law and other regulations by advertising used motor vehicles for sale without disclosing to consumers the vehicle’s prior damage or prior use; selling vehicles “as-is” when they qualified for a warranty; and permitting third parties to advertise, offer for sale or sell used motor vehicles on Craigslist that were titled to RLMB.

Bloom’s attorney, Robert Kobin, said his client was under the impression that he had “worked out” all but one of the charges with the attorney general after being under investigation since October of 2012. The final charge, Kobin said, was related to a former employee, hired to run the retail division of Bloom’s wholesale-retail operation, who was fired at the end of 2012 after “this and other issues came to light.”

“We thought it was resolved, and then they filed these charges in the spring,” Kobin said.

Health problems and an ongoing trial related to the former employee, Kobin said, limited Bloom’s ability to file a timely response, resulting in the default judgment this week. Kobin said he is currently working with his client on a lengthy affidavit to address all the charges.

“There was one minor technical issue, but other than that, they are way off base,” Kobin said of the judgment.

According to Hoffman, violations by RLMB included:

Failure to provide consumers with title and registration to used motor vehicles prior to the expiration of temporary title and/or registration;

Requiring consumers sign blank sales documents;

Offering used motor vehicles for sale at the dealership location that did not have prominently displayed the Federal Trade Commission Used Car Buyers Guide, a document which, among other things, indicates whether such vehicle comes with a warranty;

Offering for sale used motor vehicles that did not have the total selling price conspicuously posted;

Advertising and/or offering for sale used motor vehicles through the RLMB website, without the required statement that “price(s) include(s) all costs to be paid by a consumer, except for licensing costs, registration fees and taxes.”

RLMB also was charged with failure to itemize documentary service fees and, since at least 2007, has failed to pay the 50-cent administrative fee for each used motor vehicle sold, as required by the UCLL and UCLL regulations.​

The judgment requires the defendants to pay $640,000 in civil penalties, $31,200.91 in reimbursement to the state for its legal and investigative costs and $22,445 in restitution to seven consumers.

“The penalty ordered in this matter is appropriate and should send a clear message to all motor vehicle dealerships that violating our consumer protection laws and regulations comes at a steep price,” Hoffman said.  “We are continuing to review the practices of new and used motor vehicle dealers to ensure consumers are not taken advantage of.”

Staff Writer William Westhoven: 973-917-9242; wwesthoven@GannettNJ.com.

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Written by: William Westhoven

Los Angeles Lemon Law Attorney Comments on Ram Pickup Truck Buyback – Satellite PR News (press release)

    OAK PARK, CA, August 18, 2015 /24-7PressRelease/ — A settlement between the government and Fiat Chrysler last month requires the automaker to issue a buyback offer to the owners of more than 500,000 Ram pickups with defective steering components. The Law Office of Howard D. Silver announced Wednesday that it is prepared to act on behalf of consumers who have incurred undue expenses as a result of the mechanical issues facing these pickup trucks.

“We’re glad that Chrysler is stepping up and paying, but sometimes consumers need assistance,” said principal attorney Howard Silver. “I’m available to help.”

According to the Associated Press, the settlement between Fiat Chrysler and government regulators settles issues stemming from “allegations of misconduct in 23 recalls covering more than 11 million vehicles.” The automaker is subject to a record $105 million civil fine, and must also accept trade-ins or finance repairs for Jeeps with unsafe rear fuel tanks.

The following makes and model years of Ram pickups are included in the buyback:

– 2009-2012 RAM 1500
– 2008-2012 RAM 2500, 3500, 4500, 5500 4×4
– 2009-2011 Dodge Dakota
– 2009 Dodge Durango
– 2009 Chrysler Aspen
– 2008 RAM 1500 Mega Cab 4×4

About the Law Office of Howard D. Silver

Serving clients throughout Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside and Ventura counties, attorney Howard Silver acts on behalf of consumers in a variety of different cases. In addition to protecting the rights of automobile owners under California’s Song-Beverly Act, the firm also assists consumers who have been the victim of fraud, identity theft, debt collection harassment and more.

Firm website: http://www.caconsumeradvocate.com/

Social media:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CAConsumerAdvocate
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LawOfficesofHowardDSilverOakPark/posts
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/caconsumeradvocate

Source: 24×7 ALL
Los Angeles Lemon Law Attorney Comments on Ram Pickup Truck Buyback

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Public Records – Springfield News Sun

COMMON PLEAS COURT

NEW SUITS

15-CV-0551 – The Bank of New York Mellon, as Indenture Trustee, v. Scott E. Henry, 3239 Tackett St., et al., complaint in foreclosure for $93,044.

15-CV-0552 – Bank of America, N.A., v. Eric G. Cole, Tipp City and New Carlisle, et al., complaint in foreclosure for property located at 304 Prentice Dr., New Carlisle, for $47,525.

15-CV-0553 – Keith Cork, New Carlisle, v. FCA US, LLC, c/o CT Corporation System, Cleveland, complaint in excess of $25,000 and/or the statutory minimum of $200 for each additional unlawful act specified over and above any treble damage award for Ohio Lemon Law, etc., concerning purchase of 2013 Dodge Dart.

15-CV-0554 – Discover Bank, c/o Zwicker & Assoc., P.C., v. Sam T. Wildofsky, 2277 Shrine Road, complaint for $15,279.

15-DR-0679 – Alexander T. Rader, Enon, v. Kristina M. Rader, Enon, complaint for divorce.

15-DP-0680 – Kimberly S. Strother, 2249 Clifton Ave., v. Clarence L. Harris Jr., 133 The Post Road, Apt. H, petition for civil stalking protection order.

15-DP-0681 – Janet M. Blankenship, North Hampton, v. Richard A. Baughman, West Chester, petition for domestic violence civil protection order.

15-DP-0682 – Ashlee N. Zinn, 1331 Beverly Ave., v. Shane Rogan, 1323 Beverly St., petition for civil stalking protection order.

15-DP-0683 – Ashlee N. Zinn, 1331 Beverly Ave., v. Julio Freeman, 31 N. Race St., petition for civil sexually oriented offense protection order.

CURRENT BUSINESS

State of Ohio v. Karen Saum, community control extended an additional two years from date due to expire to allow additional time necessary to pay outstanding court costs.

State of Ohio v. Yonatan A. Ayele, community control terminated, all fines, court costs and community control fees suspended.

State of Ohio v. Eric Bartley, convicted of deception to obtain a dangerous drug, two years community control.

State of Ohio v. Kent Puckett, case dismissed.

State of Ohio v. Dre Untay Diontae Davenport, convicted of aggravated possession of drugs, five years community control, six months driver’s license suspension.

Wells Fargo Bank, NA, v. Tausha R. Davis, et al., decree in foreclosure in rem.

The Bank of New York Mellon, as Trustee, v. Shane Bogardus, et al., judgment in rem.

Wells Fargo Bank, NA, v. Timothy D. Johnson, et al., judgment in rem.

National Collegiate Student Loan Trust 2007-2 v. Todd R. Fain, judgment for $16,667.

The Cincinnati Insurance Company, et al., v. Lisa Levalley, judgment for $22,596.

David Leist v. Mad River Township Fire Department, et al., case closed.

Leah Skaggs v. Angel Harper, civil stalking protection order dismissed.

Annette M. Bauer v. Robert A. English, decree of divorce granted on the grounds of incompatibility.

Justin E. Weaver v. Brett E. Weaver, case dismissed.

Annette Patten v. James Alan Phipps, case dismissed.

Miranda E. Vaughn v. Gary Hubbard II, case dismissed.

Dezeray Z. Risner v. Vincent N. Risner, domestic violence civil protection order granted.

PROBATE COURT

Marriage Licenses

Paula Jean Harris, 30, 2645 Casey Dr., registered nurse, to David Nelson Copley, 26, 2645 Casey Dr., aircraft mechanic.

Adam Jason Agle, 34, South Charleston, farmer, to Megan Marie Dent, 39, South Charleston, administrative assistant.

Amy Leann Waugh, 44, 1421 S. Center St., to Thomas Harrison Brown, 64, 1421 S. Center St., truck driver.

Kristen Sue Bahan, 49, 3314 Upper Valley Pike, safety specialist, to Tamara Renae Breslin, 48, 3314 Upper Valley Pike, auto sales.

Zachary Allan Thompson, 27, Enon, carpenter, to Chantelle Jocelyn L. Garlough, 24, Enon, ophthalmic technician.

Brittney Lee Gibson, 25, New Carlisle, accountant, to Brian Christopher Langford, 30, Kettering, maintenance technician.

AUDITOR’S OFFICE

Property Transfers

Jean E. White to Howard J. Norris, 937 Bischoff Road, New Carlisle; $112,000.

Damon E. and Ronda F. Boomershine to Courtney Conn, 1914 Lincoln Dr., Medway; $31,500.

Ronald E. Furlong to Kenneth C. and Shanon R. Brogan, 0 Kennedy Dr., three parcels, Medway; no fee.

Robert R. and Betty A. Kemper to Betty A. Kemper, 204 W. Main St., Medway; no fee.

Daniel S. Rihm to Ashlee N. Landis, 348 Greenacres Dr., Springfield; $100,000.

Julius L. and Nancy A. Knauer to Nancy A. Knauer, 4284 Osborn Road, Medway; no fee.

Maik and Tanja Deubel to Julia E. and Chad E. Buddenberg, 200 Owners Dr., Tremont City; $267,000.

Jeffory A. Smith and Katrina L. Donohue to Katrina L. Smith, 248 E. Main St., South Vienna; no fee.

Ernest O. and Christina L. Speiser to Rogers & Sons, LLC, 425 E. Main St., Enon; $140,000.

Jill Ann Williams to Jack G. Woodhouse, 0 Moorefield Road, Springfield; no fee.

Jack L. and Mary Lou Russell to Jack L. Russell, 4711 Merrimont Ave., Springfield; no fee.

Heather A. Albertson to Moses E. Peterson Jr., 4426 Tulane Road, Springfield; $88,000.

John A. Jenkins to James P. and Margaret L. Jenkins, 2178 Shawnee Ave., Springfield; $36,500.

John J. and Eugenia D. Dalton to Eugenia C. Dalton, 4203 New Carlisle Pike, Springfield; no fee.

Jacob M. and Darci E. Allen to Mark A. Bollinger and Crystal M. Coates, 1426 Marinette Dr., Springfield; $102,000.

Charles Eugene McAllister to Lingzhen Weng, 620 Torrence Dr., Springfield; $130,000.

Anthony R. Coplen to IBC Properties LLC, 1813 E. High St., Springfield; no fee.

Louis B. and Allie V. Jones to Varga Berrien, 243 W. Perrin Ave., Springfield; $28,000.

Marjorie Ellen Brumfield to Marla R. Glaser, 1927 Erie Ave., Springfield; no fee.

John D. Igoe to IBC Properties LLC, 1021 N. Limestone St., Springfield; no fee.

Anthony R. Coplen to IBC Properties LLC, 309 Stanton Ave., Springfield; no fee.

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Upcoming events and programs at the Senior Wellness Center – Marietta Daily Journal

The Senior Wellness Center, 1150 Powder Springs St. in Marietta, will have the following upcoming events and programs for the month of September for seniors, ages 55-plus:

♦ Sept. 1, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., will be World Cuisine: Italy. Join Dashir Moore, instructor from Chattahoochee Technical College’s Culinary Arts Program, in the teaching kitchen and learn how to make favorite dishes from around the world. Cost is $8 for Cobb County residents, $10 for non-residents.

♦ Sept. 3, from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m., will be Fall Prevention, presented by The Good Life club. Participants can learn how one can modify one’s environment and one’s health to protect one’s self from falling.

♦ Sept. 4, from 10 a.m. to noon, will be “Hexie” Beginner Quilting Workshop. “Hexies,” which are hexagon shaped pieces of fabric and are the latest craze in the quilting world, but go way back in quilting history. When pieced together, fabric “hexies” create beautiful quilts. Participants can join Stella Lang of the East Cobb Quilters Guild who will instruct on how to make one’s own “hexie” quilt. The supply fee is included in registration fee.

♦ Sept. 9, from 11 a.m. to noon, will be The New Lemon Law, presented by the Consumer Protection Unit of the Georgia Department of Law. The Governor’s Office of Consumer Protection administers Georgia’s Lemon Law, which is designed first and foremost to help one get their defective vehicle repaired. The law also calls for consumers to follow certain steps. Participants can learn steps to take and how to proceed in order to resolve the problem.

♦ Sept. 15, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., will be Appetizers and Finger Foods. Participants can join Elizabeth Weaver of Elizabeth’s Edibles for a demonstration on how to make light bites. cost is $8 for Cobb residents, $10 for non-residents.

♦ Sept. 17, from 11 a.m. to noon., will be Diabetes Education. Participants can join Metro Atlanta Retired Senior Volunteer Program to learn more about this prevalent disease and the steps to diagnose, prevent and treat diabetes. Materials provided by American Diabetes Association.

♦ Sept. 21, from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m., will be Mosaic Jewelry Workshops. Julie Mazzoni will guide participants in making their own mosaic jewelry pieces using glass, tile and sterling silver plated bezel wire. Cost is $5 for Cobb residents, $8 for non-residents and a $10 supply fee to be paid to the instructor.

♦ Sept. 22, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, will be veteran’s Administration: Your Benefits. Participants can join Freddie Daniels of the Georgia Department of Veterans Service for a presentation on available benefits and services.

♦ Sept. 23, from 11 a.m. to noon, will be Alton Russell, Storyteller: Pre-1840 American Frontier. Alton Russell has stories of history of the country, including the Revolutionary War, Declaration of Independence, War of 1812 and other events in America’s early history. All stories are told in period-correct attire. Participants can hear a story about the days of pre-1840 frontier.

♦ Sept. 30, from 11 a.m. to noon, will be Reconstruction and the Railroad, presented by the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History. In 1862, the Pacific Railway Act was approved, assuring private railroad companies that the government would subsidize the cost to build a transcontinental railroad. Participants can learn about the Reconstruction period, the Transcontinental Railroad system and role of the railroads in the industrialization of the nation.

All events are free, but require registration unless otherwise noted.

For more information, call (770) 528-5355 or visit www.CobbSeniors.org.

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Written by: Damon Poirier