'Lemon law king' Vince Megna to turn away Trump voters | Politics … – Madison.com

After years of representing clients he says he can’t stomach, Vince Megna has had enough. The so-called “lemon law king” has declared that he’ll no longer take clients who voted for Donald Trump.

“I can’t do it anymore,” he said. “I don’t want to be sitting in my conference room talking to someone who has voted for Trump, because I won’t be able to represent them. I have no passion. I don’t care what happens with their car.”

Megna posted notice of his new policy Tuesday on Facebook:

“As of February 1, 2017 I will no longer represent any person who voted for Donald Trump. I refuse to help people who blame the poor for everything, hate immigrants and still want to send the blacks back. But when they get a bad car and want money from ‘General Motors’ it’s the end of the world.”

He added: “Please share. I want this to get out.

Megna posted it on Tuesday and by Wednesday two other lawyers sent him messages to say they were following suit.

But he’s never blatantly turned away business until now.

How is he going to know the political leanings of his prospective clients?

“I’ll know,” he said. “I’ll ask.”

He’s asked four prospective clients so far and turned down one. 

Megna said he’s one of the only attorneys left in Wisconsin who will take on a defective car case, since Republicans gutted the state’s lemon law a few years back. So effectively, he said, there’s nowhere to go for Trump voters with defective cars.

“There really isn’t,” he said.

Megna’s not the only one whose business interests have collided with the hyper-partisan political mania of the Trump era.

The trade union at Air France is calling on members to refuse to work on U.S.-bound flights because of Trump’s order barring entrance to immigrants and travelers from seven Muslim countries.

And it cuts both ways. Trump supporters irritated at Starbucks’ vow to hire thousands of refugees and displaced immigrants are promising a boycott of the world’s foremost caffeine dispensary.

As Madison as it gets: Get Cap Times’ highlights sent daily to your inbox

Then there’s Kris Coulon, a frame shop owner in Aspen, Colorado, who came under fire when a customer told “Fox & Friends” that her requesst to get pictures of an inaugural party framed was refused.

Coulon, who wasn’t interviewed for the segment, said she refused the business because the photos were water-damaged and irreparable. :

“The thing is, I’d frame anything for anybody,” she told the Aspen Times. “I’m in the business to make money. I have plenty of clients who are major conservatives. I’ve framed things of George Bush, Cheney.”

Her voicemail box quickly filled.

“The worst part of it is the hate,” she said.

Megna, who’s been sticking it to car companies for 26 years, can afford to be choosy.

“I’ve been doing this a long time,” he said. “I’m not really here for the money anymore. We make money. We make quite a bit of money. But that’s not what motivates me.”

He said he’s had two lawyers, one from Wisconsin and one in California, contact him to say they plan to follow his lead.

The note from the attorney from California said: “I’m with you on this. I’m not going to do it either. But in California there’s not that many Trumpsters.”

Share your opinion on this topic by sending a letter to the editor to tctvoice@madison.com. Include your full name, hometown and phone number. Your name and town will be published. The phone number is for verification purposes only. Please keep your letter to 250 words or less.

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How new laws soured Wisconsin's once-strong Lemon Law – WISN Milwaukee

MILWAUKEE —

Wisconsin once boasted some of the most consumer-friendly laws in the nation, but changes in recent years have soured the state’s once-robust “Lemon Law.”

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The most significant changes that have tipped the scales away from consumers involve a cap on compensation for attorneys and a reduction in the time allowed to make a claim. Consumers also no longer have a choice between a refund or replacement vehicle.

“We have the worst law in the country, and it used to be the best,” said Wauwatosa attorney Vince Megna, who built a national reputation as the king of the Lemon Law

Megna boasts that he’s sued General Motors more than 400 times without losing, but he said changes to Wisconsin law have made it less attractive and feasible for attorneys to take on cases.

In 2011, the Wisconsin legislature passed a bill to limit attorneys’ fees after Megna collected more than $150,000 in legal fees over a car dispute.

“Which might sound like a lot, but it’s not,” he said. “You’re fighting companies that will put hundreds and hundreds of thousands into defeating you on a $8,000 case.”

The new law caps attorney fees at three times the amount of damages. Megna said that means few lawyers can afford to take on the auto manufacturers, leaving consumers stuck with lemons.

“People need to get angry, we need to get angry about this,” he said.

Consumers like Leeann Beehler of Fox Point are very angry.

Her new Honda CRV was just a week old when she said she caught a strong odor of gas.

“The cabin fills with the fumes. It’s sudden and it’s very, very strong,” she explained.

Beehler said she took the CRV to a Honda dealer six times, and each time her vehicle was returned to her with technicians claiming there were no problems.

An online search turns up similar complaints.

On its invoice, the dealer noted that Honda was aware the issue affected “other new CRVs.” Beehler said she offered to let the dealer keep her car to duplicate the problem, but Honda declined.

“We can tell you that Honda is aware of the problem, but they do not have a fix,” Beehler said her Honda dealer told her.

The company offered to let her trade in the car for a new one, but she’d have to pay the difference.

She declined. Now her $30,000 CRV sits in her driveway, where it’s been since last spring. Afraid to drive it, Beehler said she and her husband went out and purchased another car.

She’s also hired a Chicago lawyer to file a federal class action lawsuit.

“Someone at Honda has made an economic decision to fight the fight rather than take care of a handful of consumers,” said Beehler’s attorney, Alex Loftus.

Contacted by WISN 12 News, a Honda spokesman said the company doesn’t comment on pending lawsuits. He encouraged any CRV owner experiencing a problem to take it to a dealer to get it resolved under the warranty, the same course of action that was of little help to Beehler.

Under Wisconsin’s Lemon Law, consumers used to get a choice as to whether they wanted refund or replacement. Now it’s the auto company’s choice. Megna said that’s another change that has hurt many lemon owners. The state has also reduced the time limit on Lemon Law claims. Consumers now get three years to file, down from the six years they were previously allotted.

WISN 12 News tried speaking to the lawmaker, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Burlington), who shepherded the changes through the legislature. His office did not respond to repeated requests to talk about the impact those changes have had on consumers.

WEBVTT ATES WHYSHE HAS A CAR SHE CAN’T DRIVE.>> LEEANN BEEHLER SAYS HER NEWHONDA CRV WAS A WEEK OLD THEFIRST TIME SHE SMELLED IT.>> I THOUGHT I PARKED OVER APUDDLE OF GAS.>> THE SMELL OF GASOLINE FLOODEDTHE CAR’S INTERIOR.>> CABIN FILLS WITH FUMES,SUDDEN AND STRONG.>> BEEHLER SAYS THE SMELL WENTAWAY, BUT IN THE FOLLOWING WEEKSREPEATEDLY RETURNED.SHE TOOK IT TO A HONDA DEALERSIX TIMES.,>> THEY GAVE IT BACK TO US ANDSAID WE FIND NO PROBLEM WITHYOUR CAR.A QUICK GOOGLE SEARCH TURNSUP SIMILAR COMPLAINTS AND ON ITSINVOICE THE DEALER NOTED THATHONDA WAS AWARE IT AFFECTEDOTHER NEW CRVS.BEEHLER SAYS SHE OFFERED TO LETTHE DEALER KEEP HER CAR TOTRY TO DUPLICATE THE PROBLEM BUT, HONDA DECLINED.>> WE CAN TELL YOU HONDA ISAWARE OF THE PROBLEM, BUT DO NOTHAVE A FIX.>> BEEHLER SAYS THE COMPANYOFFERED TO LET HER TRADE IN THECAR FOR A NEW ONE, BUT SHE’DHAVE TO PAY THE DIFFERENCE.>> WE HAVE THE WORST LAW IN THECOUNTRY, AND IT USED TO BE THEBEST.>> WAUWATOSA ATTORNEY VINCEMEGNA BUILT A NATIONALREPUTATION AS THE KING OF THELEMON LAW.>> I SUED GENERAL MOTORS 400TIMES WITHOUT LOSING.>> BUT MEGNA SAYS RECENT CHANGESIN WISCONSIN LAW HAVE GUTTED THECONSUMER PROTECTIONS THAT MADETHAT POSSIBLE.IN 2011, THE LEGISLATURE PASSEDA BILL TO LIMIT ATTORNEYS’ FEES,AFTER MEGNA COLLECTED MORE THAN$150,000 IN LEGAL FEES OVER ACAR DISPUTE.>> WHICH MIGHT SEEM LIKE ALOT,BUT IT IS NOT.YOU ARE FIGHTING COMPANIES THATWILL PUT HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDSINTO DEFEATING YOU ON AN $8,000CASE.>> THE NEW LAW CAPS ATTORNEYFEES AT THREE TIMES THE AMOUNTOF DAMAGES.HE SAYS THAT MEANS FEW LAWYERSCAN AFFORD TO TAKE ON THE AUTOMANUFACTURERS LEAVING CONSUMERS, STUCK WITH LEMONS.>> PEOPLE NEED TO GET ANGRY.WE NEED TO GET ANGRY ABOUT THIS.>> LEEANN BEEHLER IS ANGRY.>> WE HAD TO BUY ANOTHER CAR.>> SHE ALSO HIRED A CHICAGOLAWYER TO FILE A FEDERALCLASS-ACTION LAWSUIT.>> SOMEONE AT HONDA HAS MADE ANECONOMIC DECISION TO FIGHT THEFIGHT RATHER THAN TAKE CARE OFCONSUMERS.>> MEANWHILE, BEEHLER’S $30,000CRV HAS BEEN SITTING IN HERDRIVEWAY SINCE LAST SPRING.SHE’S AFRAID TO DRIVE IT.>> IT IS NOT HEALTHY, BURNS YOUREYES, NOSE, THEN YOU WORRY ABOUTIS MY CAR GOING TO BLOW UP.>> SO WE CONTACTED HONDA,PATRICK, AND IT’S SPOKESMAN SAYSTHE COMPANY DOESN’T COMMENT ONPENDING LAWSUITS.HE ENCOURAGES ANY CRV OWNEREXPERIENCING A PROBLEM TO TAKEIT TO A DEALER TO GET ITRESULT UNDER THE WARRANTY, BUTOBVIOUSLY THAT DID NOT HELPLEEANN BEEHLER MUCH.>> AND THERE HAVE BEEN OTHERCHANGES THAT AFFECT CAR BUYERSSTUCK WITH LEMONS?>> YES UNDER WISCONSIN’S LEMON, LAW, CONSUMERS USED TO GET TOCHOOSE IF THEY WANTED A REFUNDOR REPLACEMENT.NOW IT’S THE AUTO COMPANY’SCHOICE WHICH MEGNA SAYS HAS HURTMANY LEMON OWNERS.PATRICK: YOU TRIED TALKING TTHE LAWMAKER BEHIND THE CHANGES?>> ASSEMBLY SPEAKER ROBIN VOS ISFROM BURLINGTON.HE SHEPARDED THE CHANGES THROUGH

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Car-Maker Drops Overseas 'Lemon Law' Case Against Family – Military.com

The Snell family with their new 2017 RAV4 SUV, provided by Toyota. The company chose to drop an appeal late last year over whether or not the family’s 2013 RAV4 was covered under Georgia’s lemon law. (Photo: Courtesy of Christina Snell.)

A military couple whose U.S.-purchased 2013 Toyota RAV4 SUV experienced major mechanical problems while they were stationed in Germany has had their vehicle replaced by Toyota after the company dropped an appeal that argued the couple was not protected under rules known as “lemon laws.”

When Army Sgt. John Snell and his wife Christina purchased the new vehicle in Georgia before their permanent change of station move, the dealer told them that the warranty and rules protecting them against catastrophic vehicle defects, or “lemon laws,” would apply, they said.

But when a faulty anti-lock brake system actuator caused major mechanical problems, the Germany-based dealership was unable to make repairs in under 30 days, the time cap required by Georgia before the car is declared a “lemon.” Rather than replace the car, Toyota said the law did not apply because the couple was out of the country. The repairs took more than 90 days, Christina Snell said.

A Georgia panel ruled last year in the Snells’ favor, but Toyota filed an appeal, saying that it had covered the costs of the repairs.

“Toyota doesn’t believe this delay in fully repairing the vehicle in Germany qualifies it for repurchase, as the Snells requested in arbitration,” Aaron Fowles, a Toyota spokesman, said in a statement posted in October to Change.org where the Snells had a petition on the case.

But instead of going through with the appeal, Toyota offered to settle the case late last year — a move Christina Snell believes was forced by the thousands of signatures and hundreds of comments her petition about the case received on Change.org.

The Snells said they did not want any additional cash as part of the settlement — just their car to be replaced and some lawyer fees to be paid.

“I told my lawyer, ‘I’m not demanding anything,’ ” Christina Snell said. “I don’t know what they expected, money or additional payment. I just really wanted my car replaced.”

Toyota did not respond to requests for comment about the settlement.

Under the settlement, the couple was permitted to trade in their 2013 vehicle and received a new 2017 RAV4 this month, Christina Snell said.

The settlement is a big victory for military consumers, said Rosemary Shahan, who leads the lobbying group Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety. She worried an appeal victory for Toyota could have resulted in car manufacturers no longer honoring lemon laws for any military personnel who take their vehicles to overseas duty stations.

The lawsuit “signaled what Toyota wanted was an appellate court decision that they could then use in every case where someone in the military took their car with them overseas,” she said. “It would’ve set a very harmful precedent, and other manufacturers would’ve been then able to cite that.”

Instead, the settlement “sends a very healthy message to manufacturers,” she said. “Toyota is very big. They thought they could get away with this.”

Christina Snell said in the end she is disappointed Toyota didn’t do what she believes to been the right thing to start with.

“I was disappointed by a company that couldn’t be forthcoming,” she said. “After all this is said and done, I realize Toyota has the right to appeal … but I don’t think they did that in the best interest of the consumer.”

— Amy Bushatz can be reached at amy.bushatz@military.com.

© Copyright 2017 
Military.com
. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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'Lemon law king' Vince Megna to turn away Trump voters – Madison.com

After years of representing clients he says he can’t stomach, Vince Megna has had enough. The so-called “lemon law king” has declared that he’ll no longer take clients who voted for Donald Trump.

“I can’t do it anymore,” he said. “I don’t want to be sitting in my conference room talking to someone who has voted for Trump, because I won’t be able to represent them. I have no passion. I don’t care what happens with their car.”

Megna posted notice of his new policy Tuesday on Facebook:

“As of February 1, 2017 I will no longer represent any person who voted for Donald Trump. I refuse to help people who blame the poor for everything, hate immigrants and still want to send the blacks back. But when they get a bad car and want money from ‘General Motors’ it’s the end of the world.”

He added: “Please share. I want this to get out.

Megna posted it on Tuesday and by Wednesday two other lawyers sent him messages to say they were following suit.

But he’s never blatantly turned away business until now.

How is he going to know the political leanings of his prospective clients?

“I’ll know,” he said. “I’ll ask.”

He’s asked four prospective clients so far and turned down one. 

Megna said he’s one of the only attorneys left in Wisconsin who will take on a defective car case, since Republicans gutted the state’s lemon law a few years back. So effectively, he said, there’s nowhere to go for Trump voters with defective cars.

“There really isn’t,” he said.

Megna’s not the only one whose business interests have collided with the hyper-partisan political mania of the Trump era.

The trade union at Air France is calling on members to refuse to work on U.S.-bound flights because of Trump’s order barring entrance to immigrants and travelers from seven Muslim countries.

And it cuts both ways. Trump supporters irritated at Starbucks’ vow to hire thousands of refugees and displaced immigrants are promising a boycott of the world’s foremost caffeine dispensary.

As Madison as it gets: Get Cap Times’ highlights sent daily to your inbox

Then there’s Kris Coulon, a frame shop owner in Aspen, Colorado, who came under fire when a customer told “Fox & Friends” that her requesst to get pictures of an inaugural party framed was refused.

Coulon, who wasn’t interviewed for the segment, said she refused the business because the photos were water-damaged and irreparable. :

“The thing is, I’d frame anything for anybody,” she told the Aspen Times. “I’m in the business to make money. I have plenty of clients who are major conservatives. I’ve framed things of George Bush, Cheney.”

Her voicemail box quickly filled.

“The worst part of it is the hate,” she said.

Megna, who’s been sticking it to car companies for 26 years, can afford to be choosy.

“I’ve been doing this a long time,” he said. “I’m not really here for the money anymore. We make money. We make quite a bit of money. But that’s not what motivates me.”

He said he’s had two lawyers, one from Wisconsin and one in California, contact him to say they plan to follow his lead.

The note from the attorney from California said: “I’m with you on this. I’m not going to do it either. But in California there’s not that many Trumpsters.”

Share your opinion on this topic by sending a letter to the editor to tctvoice@madison.com. Include your full name, hometown and phone number. Your name and town will be published. The phone number is for verification purposes only. Please keep your letter to 250 words or less.

This article was not written by Michigan Lemon Law.
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How new laws soured Wisconsin's once-strong Lemon Law – WISN Milwaukee

MILWAUKEE —

Wisconsin once boasted some of the most consumer-friendly laws in the nation, but changes in recent years have soured the state’s once-robust “Lemon Law.”

Advertisement

The most significant changes that have tipped the scales away from consumers involve a cap on compensation for attorneys and a reduction in the time allowed to make a claim. Consumers also no longer have a choice between a refund or replacement vehicle.

“We have the worst law in the country, and it used to be the best,” said Wauwatosa attorney Vince Megna, who built a national reputation as the king of the Lemon Law

Megna boasts that he’s sued General Motors more than 400 times without losing, but he said changes to Wisconsin law have made it less attractive and feasible for attorneys to take on cases.

In 2011, the Wisconsin legislature passed a bill to limit attorneys’ fees after Megna collected more than $150,000 in legal fees over a car dispute.

“Which might sound like a lot, but it’s not,” he said. “You’re fighting companies that will put hundreds and hundreds of thousands into defeating you on a $8,000 case.”

The new law caps attorney fees at three times the amount of damages. Megna said that means few lawyers can afford to take on the auto manufacturers, leaving consumers stuck with lemons.

“People need to get angry, we need to get angry about this,” he said.

Consumers like Leeann Beehler of Fox Point are very angry.

Her new Honda CRV was just a week old when she said she caught a strong odor of gas.

“The cabin fills with the fumes. It’s sudden and it’s very, very strong,” she explained.

Beehler said she took the CRV to a Honda dealer six times, and each time her vehicle was returned to her with technicians claiming there were no problems.

An online search turns up similar complaints.

On its invoice, the dealer noted that Honda was aware the issue affected “other new CRVs.” Beehler said she offered to let the dealer keep her car to duplicate the problem, but Honda declined.

“We can tell you that Honda is aware of the problem, but they do not have a fix,” Beehler said her Honda dealer told her.

The company offered to let her trade in the car for a new one, but she’d have to pay the difference.

She declined. Now her $30,000 CRV sits in her driveway, where it’s been since last spring. Afraid to drive it, Beehler said she and her husband went out and purchased another car.

She’s also hired a Chicago lawyer to file a federal class action lawsuit.

“Someone at Honda has made an economic decision to fight the fight rather than take care of a handful of consumers,” said Beehler’s attorney, Alex Loftus.

Contacted by WISN 12 News, a Honda spokesman said the company doesn’t comment on pending lawsuits. He encouraged any CRV owner experiencing a problem to take it to a dealer to get it resolved under the warranty, the same course of action that was of little help to Beehler.

Under Wisconsin’s Lemon Law, consumers used to get a choice as to whether they wanted refund or replacement. Now it’s the auto company’s choice. Megna said that’s another change that has hurt many lemon owners. The state has also reduced the time limit on Lemon Law claims. Consumers now get three years to file, down from the six years they were previously allotted.

WISN 12 News tried speaking to the lawmaker, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Burlington), who shepherded the changes through the legislature. His office did not respond to repeated requests to talk about the impact those changes have had on consumers.

WEBVTT ATES WHYSHE HAS A CAR SHE CAN’T DRIVE.>> LEEANN BEEHLER SAYS HER NEWHONDA CRV WAS A WEEK OLD THEFIRST TIME SHE SMELLED IT.>> I THOUGHT I PARKED OVER APUDDLE OF GAS.>> THE SMELL OF GASOLINE FLOODEDTHE CAR’S INTERIOR.>> CABIN FILLS WITH FUMES,SUDDEN AND STRONG.>> BEEHLER SAYS THE SMELL WENTAWAY, BUT IN THE FOLLOWING WEEKSREPEATEDLY RETURNED.SHE TOOK IT TO A HONDA DEALERSIX TIMES.,>> THEY GAVE IT BACK TO US ANDSAID WE FIND NO PROBLEM WITHYOUR CAR.A QUICK GOOGLE SEARCH TURNSUP SIMILAR COMPLAINTS AND ON ITSINVOICE THE DEALER NOTED THATHONDA WAS AWARE IT AFFECTEDOTHER NEW CRVS.BEEHLER SAYS SHE OFFERED TO LETTHE DEALER KEEP HER CAR TOTRY TO DUPLICATE THE PROBLEM BUT, HONDA DECLINED.>> WE CAN TELL YOU HONDA ISAWARE OF THE PROBLEM, BUT DO NOTHAVE A FIX.>> BEEHLER SAYS THE COMPANYOFFERED TO LET HER TRADE IN THECAR FOR A NEW ONE, BUT SHE’DHAVE TO PAY THE DIFFERENCE.>> WE HAVE THE WORST LAW IN THECOUNTRY, AND IT USED TO BE THEBEST.>> WAUWATOSA ATTORNEY VINCEMEGNA BUILT A NATIONALREPUTATION AS THE KING OF THELEMON LAW.>> I SUED GENERAL MOTORS 400TIMES WITHOUT LOSING.>> BUT MEGNA SAYS RECENT CHANGESIN WISCONSIN LAW HAVE GUTTED THECONSUMER PROTECTIONS THAT MADETHAT POSSIBLE.IN 2011, THE LEGISLATURE PASSEDA BILL TO LIMIT ATTORNEYS’ FEES,AFTER MEGNA COLLECTED MORE THAN$150,000 IN LEGAL FEES OVER ACAR DISPUTE.>> WHICH MIGHT SEEM LIKE ALOT,BUT IT IS NOT.YOU ARE FIGHTING COMPANIES THATWILL PUT HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDSINTO DEFEATING YOU ON AN $8,000CASE.>> THE NEW LAW CAPS ATTORNEYFEES AT THREE TIMES THE AMOUNTOF DAMAGES.HE SAYS THAT MEANS FEW LAWYERSCAN AFFORD TO TAKE ON THE AUTOMANUFACTURERS LEAVING CONSUMERS, STUCK WITH LEMONS.>> PEOPLE NEED TO GET ANGRY.WE NEED TO GET ANGRY ABOUT THIS.>> LEEANN BEEHLER IS ANGRY.>> WE HAD TO BUY ANOTHER CAR.>> SHE ALSO HIRED A CHICAGOLAWYER TO FILE A FEDERALCLASS-ACTION LAWSUIT.>> SOMEONE AT HONDA HAS MADE ANECONOMIC DECISION TO FIGHT THEFIGHT RATHER THAN TAKE CARE OFCONSUMERS.>> MEANWHILE, BEEHLER’S $30,000CRV HAS BEEN SITTING IN HERDRIVEWAY SINCE LAST SPRING.SHE’S AFRAID TO DRIVE IT.>> IT IS NOT HEALTHY, BURNS YOUREYES, NOSE, THEN YOU WORRY ABOUTIS MY CAR GOING TO BLOW UP.>> SO WE CONTACTED HONDA,PATRICK, AND IT’S SPOKESMAN SAYSTHE COMPANY DOESN’T COMMENT ONPENDING LAWSUITS.HE ENCOURAGES ANY CRV OWNEREXPERIENCING A PROBLEM TO TAKEIT TO A DEALER TO GET ITRESULT UNDER THE WARRANTY, BUTOBVIOUSLY THAT DID NOT HELPLEEANN BEEHLER MUCH.>> AND THERE HAVE BEEN OTHERCHANGES THAT AFFECT CAR BUYERSSTUCK WITH LEMONS?>> YES UNDER WISCONSIN’S LEMON, LAW, CONSUMERS USED TO GET TOCHOOSE IF THEY WANTED A REFUNDOR REPLACEMENT.NOW IT’S THE AUTO COMPANY’SCHOICE WHICH MEGNA SAYS HAS HURTMANY LEMON OWNERS.PATRICK: YOU TRIED TALKING TTHE LAWMAKER BEHIND THE CHANGES?>> ASSEMBLY SPEAKER ROBIN VOS ISFROM BURLINGTON.HE SHEPARDED THE CHANGES THROUGH

This article was not written by Michigan Lemon Law.
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'Lemon law king' Vince Megna to turn away Trump voters – Madison.com

After years of representing clients he says he can’t stomach, Vince Megna has had enough. The so-called “lemon law king” has declared that he’ll no longer take clients who voted for Donald Trump.

“I can’t do it anymore,” he said. “I don’t want to be sitting in my conference room talking to someone who has voted for Trump, because I won’t be able to represent them. I have no passion. I don’t care what happens with their car.”

Megna posted notice of his new policy Tuesday on Facebook:

“As of February 1, 2017 I will no longer represent any person who voted for Donald Trump. I refuse to help people who blame the poor for everything, hate immigrants and still want to send the blacks back. But when they get a bad car and want money from ‘General Motors’ it’s the end of the world.”

He added: “Please share. I want this to get out.

Megna posted it on Tuesday and by Wednesday two other lawyers sent him messages to say they were following suit.

But he’s never blatantly turned away business until now.

How is he going to know the political leanings of his prospective clients?

“I’ll know,” he said. “I’ll ask.”

He’s asked four prospective clients so far and turned down one. 

Megna said he’s one of the only attorneys left in Wisconsin who will take on a defective car case, since Republicans gutted the state’s lemon law a few years back. So effectively, he said, there’s nowhere to go for Trump voters with defective cars.

“There really isn’t,” he said.

Megna’s not the only one whose business interests have collided with the hyper-partisan political mania of the Trump era.

The trade union at Air France is calling on members to refuse to work on U.S.-bound flights because of Trump’s order barring entrance to immigrants and travelers from seven Muslim countries.

And it cuts both ways. Trump supporters irritated at Starbucks’ vow to hire thousands of refugees and displaced immigrants are promising a boycott of the world’s foremost caffeine dispensary.

As Madison as it gets: Get Cap Times’ highlights sent daily to your inbox

Then there’s Kris Coulon, a frame shop owner in Aspen, Colorado, who came under fire when a customer told “Fox & Friends” that her requesst to get pictures of an inaugural party framed was refused.

Coulon, who wasn’t interviewed for the segment, said she refused the business because the photos were water-damaged and irreparable. :

“The thing is, I’d frame anything for anybody,” she told the Aspen Times. “I’m in the business to make money. I have plenty of clients who are major conservatives. I’ve framed things of George Bush, Cheney.”

Her voicemail box quickly filled.

“The worst part of it is the hate,” she said.

Megna, who’s been sticking it to car companies for 26 years, can afford to be choosy.

“I’ve been doing this a long time,” he said. “I’m not really here for the money anymore. We make money. We make quite a bit of money. But that’s not what motivates me.”

He said he’s had two lawyers, one from Wisconsin and one in California, contact him to say they plan to follow his lead.

The note from the attorney from California said: “I’m with you on this. I’m not going to do it either. But in California there’s not that many Trumpsters.”

Share your opinion on this topic by sending a letter to the editor to tctvoice@madison.com. Include your full name, hometown and phone number. Your name and town will be published. The phone number is for verification purposes only. Please keep your letter to 250 words or less.

This article was not written by Michigan Lemon Law.
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Car-Maker Drops Overseas 'Lemon Law' Case Against Family – Military.com

The Snell family with their new 2017 RAV4 SUV, provided by Toyota. The company chose to drop an appeal late last year over whether or not the family’s 2013 RAV4 was covered under Georgia’s lemon law. (Photo: Courtesy of Christina Snell.)

A military couple whose U.S.-purchased 2013 Toyota RAV4 SUV experienced major mechanical problems while they were stationed in Germany has had their vehicle replaced by Toyota after the company dropped an appeal that argued the couple was not protected under rules known as “lemon laws.”

When Army Sgt. John Snell and his wife Christina purchased the new vehicle in Georgia before their permanent change of station move, the dealer told them that the warranty and rules protecting them against catastrophic vehicle defects, or “lemon laws,” would apply, they said.

But when a faulty anti-lock brake system actuator caused major mechanical problems, the Germany-based dealership was unable to make repairs in under 30 days, the time cap required by Georgia before the car is declared a “lemon.” Rather than replace the car, Toyota said the law did not apply because the couple was out of the country. The repairs took more than 90 days, Christina Snell said.

A Georgia panel ruled last year in the Snells’ favor, but Toyota filed an appeal, saying that it had covered the costs of the repairs.

“Toyota doesn’t believe this delay in fully repairing the vehicle in Germany qualifies it for repurchase, as the Snells requested in arbitration,” Aaron Fowles, a Toyota spokesman, said in a statement posted in October to Change.org where the Snells had a petition on the case.

But instead of going through with the appeal, Toyota offered to settle the case late last year — a move Christina Snell believes was forced by the thousands of signatures and hundreds of comments her petition about the case received on Change.org.

The Snells said they did not want any additional cash as part of the settlement — just their car to be replaced and some lawyer fees to be paid.

“I told my lawyer, ‘I’m not demanding anything,’ ” Christina Snell said. “I don’t know what they expected, money or additional payment. I just really wanted my car replaced.”

Toyota did not respond to requests for comment about the settlement.

Under the settlement, the couple was permitted to trade in their 2013 vehicle and received a new 2017 RAV4 this month, Christina Snell said.

The settlement is a big victory for military consumers, said Rosemary Shahan, who leads the lobbying group Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety. She worried an appeal victory for Toyota could have resulted in car manufacturers no longer honoring lemon laws for any military personnel who take their vehicles to overseas duty stations.

The lawsuit “signaled what Toyota wanted was an appellate court decision that they could then use in every case where someone in the military took their car with them overseas,” she said. “It would’ve set a very harmful precedent, and other manufacturers would’ve been then able to cite that.”

Instead, the settlement “sends a very healthy message to manufacturers,” she said. “Toyota is very big. They thought they could get away with this.”

Christina Snell said in the end she is disappointed Toyota didn’t do what she believes to been the right thing to start with.

“I was disappointed by a company that couldn’t be forthcoming,” she said. “After all this is said and done, I realize Toyota has the right to appeal … but I don’t think they did that in the best interest of the consumer.”

— Amy Bushatz can be reached at amy.bushatz@military.com.

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How new laws soured Wisconsin's once-strong Lemon Law – WISN Milwaukee

MILWAUKEE —

Wisconsin once boasted some of the most consumer-friendly laws in the nation, but changes in recent years have soured the state’s once-robust “Lemon Law.”

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The most significant changes that have tipped the scales away from consumers involve a cap on compensation for attorneys and a reduction in the time allowed to make a claim. Consumers also no longer have a choice between a refund or replacement vehicle.

“We have the worst law in the country, and it used to be the best,” said Wauwatosa attorney Vince Megna, who built a national reputation as the king of the Lemon Law

Megna boasts that he’s sued General Motors more than 400 times without losing, but he said changes to Wisconsin law have made it less attractive and feasible for attorneys to take on cases.

In 2011, the Wisconsin legislature passed a bill to limit attorneys’ fees after Megna collected more than $150,000 in legal fees over a car dispute.

“Which might sound like a lot, but it’s not,” he said. “You’re fighting companies that will put hundreds and hundreds of thousands into defeating you on a $8,000 case.”

The new law caps attorney fees at three times the amount of damages. Megna said that means few lawyers can afford to take on the auto manufacturers, leaving consumers stuck with lemons.

“People need to get angry, we need to get angry about this,” he said.

Consumers like Leeann Beehler of Fox Point are very angry.

Her new Honda CRV was just a week old when she said she caught a strong odor of gas.

“The cabin fills with the fumes. It’s sudden and it’s very, very strong,” she explained.

Beehler said she took the CRV to a Honda dealer six times, and each time her vehicle was returned to her with technicians claiming there were no problems.

An online search turns up similar complaints.

On its invoice, the dealer noted that Honda was aware the issue affected “other new CRVs.” Beehler said she offered to let the dealer keep her car to duplicate the problem, but Honda declined.

“We can tell you that Honda is aware of the problem, but they do not have a fix,” Beehler said her Honda dealer told her.

The company offered to let her trade in the car for a new one, but she’d have to pay the difference.

She declined. Now her $30,000 CRV sits in her driveway, where it’s been since last spring. Afraid to drive it, Beehler said she and her husband went out and purchased another car.

She’s also hired a Chicago lawyer to file a federal class action lawsuit.

“Someone at Honda has made an economic decision to fight the fight rather than take care of a handful of consumers,” said Beehler’s attorney, Alex Loftus.

Contacted by WISN 12 News, a Honda spokesman said the company doesn’t comment on pending lawsuits. He encouraged any CRV owner experiencing a problem to take it to a dealer to get it resolved under the warranty, the same course of action that was of little help to Beehler.

Under Wisconsin’s Lemon Law, consumers used to get a choice as to whether they wanted refund or replacement. Now it’s the auto company’s choice. Megna said that’s another change that has hurt many lemon owners. The state has also reduced the time limit on Lemon Law claims. Consumers now get three years to file, down from the six years they were previously allotted.

WISN 12 News tried speaking to the lawmaker, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Burlington), who shepherded the changes through the legislature. His office did not respond to repeated requests to talk about the impact those changes have had on consumers.

WEBVTT ATES WHYSHE HAS A CAR SHE CAN’T DRIVE.>> LEEANN BEEHLER SAYS HER NEWHONDA CRV WAS A WEEK OLD THEFIRST TIME SHE SMELLED IT.>> I THOUGHT I PARKED OVER APUDDLE OF GAS.>> THE SMELL OF GASOLINE FLOODEDTHE CAR’S INTERIOR.>> CABIN FILLS WITH FUMES,SUDDEN AND STRONG.>> BEEHLER SAYS THE SMELL WENTAWAY, BUT IN THE FOLLOWING WEEKSREPEATEDLY RETURNED.SHE TOOK IT TO A HONDA DEALERSIX TIMES.,>> THEY GAVE IT BACK TO US ANDSAID WE FIND NO PROBLEM WITHYOUR CAR.A QUICK GOOGLE SEARCH TURNSUP SIMILAR COMPLAINTS AND ON ITSINVOICE THE DEALER NOTED THATHONDA WAS AWARE IT AFFECTEDOTHER NEW CRVS.BEEHLER SAYS SHE OFFERED TO LETTHE DEALER KEEP HER CAR TOTRY TO DUPLICATE THE PROBLEM BUT, HONDA DECLINED.>> WE CAN TELL YOU HONDA ISAWARE OF THE PROBLEM, BUT DO NOTHAVE A FIX.>> BEEHLER SAYS THE COMPANYOFFERED TO LET HER TRADE IN THECAR FOR A NEW ONE, BUT SHE’DHAVE TO PAY THE DIFFERENCE.>> WE HAVE THE WORST LAW IN THECOUNTRY, AND IT USED TO BE THEBEST.>> WAUWATOSA ATTORNEY VINCEMEGNA BUILT A NATIONALREPUTATION AS THE KING OF THELEMON LAW.>> I SUED GENERAL MOTORS 400TIMES WITHOUT LOSING.>> BUT MEGNA SAYS RECENT CHANGESIN WISCONSIN LAW HAVE GUTTED THECONSUMER PROTECTIONS THAT MADETHAT POSSIBLE.IN 2011, THE LEGISLATURE PASSEDA BILL TO LIMIT ATTORNEYS’ FEES,AFTER MEGNA COLLECTED MORE THAN$150,000 IN LEGAL FEES OVER ACAR DISPUTE.>> WHICH MIGHT SEEM LIKE ALOT,BUT IT IS NOT.YOU ARE FIGHTING COMPANIES THATWILL PUT HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDSINTO DEFEATING YOU ON AN $8,000CASE.>> THE NEW LAW CAPS ATTORNEYFEES AT THREE TIMES THE AMOUNTOF DAMAGES.HE SAYS THAT MEANS FEW LAWYERSCAN AFFORD TO TAKE ON THE AUTOMANUFACTURERS LEAVING CONSUMERS, STUCK WITH LEMONS.>> PEOPLE NEED TO GET ANGRY.WE NEED TO GET ANGRY ABOUT THIS.>> LEEANN BEEHLER IS ANGRY.>> WE HAD TO BUY ANOTHER CAR.>> SHE ALSO HIRED A CHICAGOLAWYER TO FILE A FEDERALCLASS-ACTION LAWSUIT.>> SOMEONE AT HONDA HAS MADE ANECONOMIC DECISION TO FIGHT THEFIGHT RATHER THAN TAKE CARE OFCONSUMERS.>> MEANWHILE, BEEHLER’S $30,000CRV HAS BEEN SITTING IN HERDRIVEWAY SINCE LAST SPRING.SHE’S AFRAID TO DRIVE IT.>> IT IS NOT HEALTHY, BURNS YOUREYES, NOSE, THEN YOU WORRY ABOUTIS MY CAR GOING TO BLOW UP.>> SO WE CONTACTED HONDA,PATRICK, AND IT’S SPOKESMAN SAYSTHE COMPANY DOESN’T COMMENT ONPENDING LAWSUITS.HE ENCOURAGES ANY CRV OWNEREXPERIENCING A PROBLEM TO TAKEIT TO A DEALER TO GET ITRESULT UNDER THE WARRANTY, BUTOBVIOUSLY THAT DID NOT HELPLEEANN BEEHLER MUCH.>> AND THERE HAVE BEEN OTHERCHANGES THAT AFFECT CAR BUYERSSTUCK WITH LEMONS?>> YES UNDER WISCONSIN’S LEMON, LAW, CONSUMERS USED TO GET TOCHOOSE IF THEY WANTED A REFUNDOR REPLACEMENT.NOW IT’S THE AUTO COMPANY’SCHOICE WHICH MEGNA SAYS HAS HURTMANY LEMON OWNERS.PATRICK: YOU TRIED TALKING TTHE LAWMAKER BEHIND THE CHANGES?>> ASSEMBLY SPEAKER ROBIN VOS ISFROM BURLINGTON.HE SHEPARDED THE CHANGES THROUGH

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'Lemon law king' Vince Megna to turn away Trump voters – Madison.com

After years of representing clients he says he can’t stomach, Vince Megna has had enough. The so-called “lemon law king” has declared that he’ll no longer take clients who voted for Donald Trump.

“I can’t do it anymore,” he said. “I don’t want to be sitting in my conference room talking to someone who has voted for Trump, because I won’t be able to represent them. I have no passion. I don’t care what happens with their car.”

Megna posted notice of his new policy Tuesday on Facebook:

“As of February 1, 2017 I will no longer represent any person who voted for Donald Trump. I refuse to help people who blame the poor for everything, hate immigrants and still want to send the blacks back. But when they get a bad car and want money from ‘General Motors’ it’s the end of the world.”

He added: “Please share. I want this to get out.

Megna posted it on Tuesday and by Wednesday two other lawyers sent him messages to say they were following suit.

But he’s never blatantly turned away business until now.

How is he going to know the political leanings of his prospective clients?

“I’ll know,” he said. “I’ll ask.”

He’s asked four prospective clients so far and turned down one. 

Megna said he’s one of the only attorneys left in Wisconsin who will take on a defective car case, since Republicans gutted the state’s lemon law a few years back. So effectively, he said, there’s nowhere to go for Trump voters with defective cars.

“There really isn’t,” he said.

Megna’s not the only one whose business interests have collided with the hyper-partisan political mania of the Trump era.

The trade union at Air France is calling on members to refuse to work on U.S.-bound flights because of Trump’s order barring entrance to immigrants and travelers from seven Muslim countries.

And it cuts both ways. Trump supporters irritated at Starbucks’ vow to hire thousands of refugees and displaced immigrants are promising a boycott of the world’s foremost caffeine dispensary.

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Then there’s Kris Coulon, a frame shop owner in Aspen, Colorado, who came under fire when a customer told “Fox & Friends” that her requesst to get pictures of an inaugural party framed was refused.

Coulon, who wasn’t interviewed for the segment, said she refused the business because the photos were water-damaged and irreparable. :

“The thing is, I’d frame anything for anybody,” she told the Aspen Times. “I’m in the business to make money. I have plenty of clients who are major conservatives. I’ve framed things of George Bush, Cheney.”

Her voicemail box quickly filled.

“The worst part of it is the hate,” she said.

Megna, who’s been sticking it to car companies for 26 years, can afford to be choosy.

“I’ve been doing this a long time,” he said. “I’m not really here for the money anymore. We make money. We make quite a bit of money. But that’s not what motivates me.”

He said he’s had two lawyers, one from Wisconsin and one in California, contact him to say they plan to follow his lead.

The note from the attorney from California said: “I’m with you on this. I’m not going to do it either. But in California there’s not that many Trumpsters.”

Share your opinion on this topic by sending a letter to the editor to tctvoice@madison.com. Include your full name, hometown and phone number. Your name and town will be published. The phone number is for verification purposes only. Please keep your letter to 250 words or less.

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