Urine Smell 'Unbearable' In Newly Purchased Home

(via wpxi.com)– A Washington Township couple claims they unknowingly purchased a home that smells of urine throughout.

Jim Gilmore said he and his wife closed on the home about a year ago, but weren’t told about a major problem.

Gilmore said the stench of urine in the home is so bad, he and his wife have not been able to live in it. When he first visited the home, Gilmore said the smell was masked by the smell of wood stain.

“This is the bathroom. All these cupboards and shelves were soaked with urine. Every shelf in this house was soaked,” Gilmore said.

The Gilmores said they tried to fix the problem by redoing the floors and painting the ceilings, but soon after white spots began to appear on the floor.

Gilmore claims the sellers didn’t tell him a mentally disabled man lived there for years and urinated on almost everything. Gilmore said he’s spent about $30,000 on trying to fix the issue, but the smell will not go away.

“Where’s the lemon law to help somebody like me? If you buy a car and it’s screwed up, you get three chances to take it back. I can’t live in this,” said Gilmore.

Consumer 10 Breaks Down Automotive Rumors

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Consumer 10’s Kurt Ludlow got to the bottom of three of the most common car myths.

One of the rumors involves whether thieves could steal cars by using vehicle identification
numbers to get duplicate keys through auto dealerships.

Auto dealer Rick Ricart from Ricart Automotive said that is false.

SPECIAL SECTION: 
Consumer
10

“You do need a VIN number but you also need to show proof of ownership of the vehicle – either
the title, registration – something with your name on it and the VIN number, and then
identification to prove that it is you before you get that second key cut,” Ricart said.

Another rumor involves purchasing gasoline.  There are some who believe that gas purchasers
who fail to press “clear” after refueling risk more charges appearing on their credit or debit
card.

As soon as a person hangs up the gas nozzle, the transaction is canceled.

A third rumor that Ludlow debunked is whether Ohio’s lemon law covers both new and used
vehicles.

“The lemon law only covers new cars,” Ricart said.  “If the same problem occurs three times
in the first year and can’t be repaired, you do have the ability to file for the Lemon Law with the
Ohio Attorney General, on new cars only.”

Consumer 10 puts shopping rumors to the test Monday at 11 p.m. on 10TV News HD.

©2011 by 10TV.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Lawmaker proposes 'lemon law'

MANILA, Philippines – Las Piñas City Rep. Mark Villar has proposed the enactment of a ‘lemon law’ to protect buyers of defective motor vehicles.

He said his Bill 1966 would strengthen consumer protection in the purchase of brand new vehicles and provide for legal remedies to buyers of substandard units.

He said his proposal is patterned after American state laws that provide a remedy for purchasers of cars that repeatedly fail to meet standards of quality and performance.

“If the car is repaired four or more times for the same defect within the warranty period and the defect has not been fixed, it should be classified as a lemon,” he said.

“I believe it is appropriate to recommend the passage of a law that would give ample protection to buyers who continue to be burdened retaining the lemon vehicle and paying the expensive repair cost without equitable redress for their unlucky fate,” he stressed.

The Villar bill would cover brand new motor vehicles with defect reported by the consumer within twelve months from the date of delivery or P20,000 kilometers of operation after such delivery, whichever comes first.

It would be the obligation of the manufacturer, distributor, authorized dealer or retailer to attend to the complaints of the consumer upon receipt of the motor vehicle and the notice of defect.

To compensate for the non-usage of the vehicle while it is under repair, the manufacturer would provide the consumer with a reasonable amount of daily transportation allowance or a service vehicle.

If the consumer remains unsatisfied with the dealer-manufacturer’s efforts to repair the vehicle, the consumer may file a complaint with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI).   

What should you do if the debt collectors call?

Most importantly, don’t, under any circumstances, acknowledge that you owe any money, since you could be re-starting the statute of limitations on that loan. If you believe that you might have long-standing debts, check with the Secretary of State’s office in Columbia to discover the length of time that a debt collector has remaining to sue you to recover any debt.

As a last resort, if you do owe the debt, it will make sense to negotiate how much you must repay to eliminate that balance. Often, collection agencies are willing to take less than the total outstanding amount, particularly if you legitimately cannot repay that amount in full.

Scammers are still out there. Here is the latest one that I have been made aware of: you get a telephone call, and you note on the caller ID that the call is from your credit card company. The caller states that you have been approved for a fabulous new credit card offer, so you provide the caller with your date of birth, social security number, and other personal information. Oops, you may have just been scammed, since there is a widely available telephone switch that will display any company’s name in your caller ID. Here is the way to protect yourself: when you get the call, ask for a call back number, and then check the caller ID after you place the call.

How much of your portfolio should be in equity investments? The answer to this question centers around one of my favorite topics: your risk tolerance. What annual percentage loss are you willing to stomach in a given year? One financial planner, Paul Merriman, has gone on record as recommending that if you can stand a 25 percent annual loss in your portfolio’s value, you should consider a 70/30 split between equities and fixed dollar investments in your account, and, as a result, you should expect a 30-year annualized rate of return of almost 12 percent. If you can handle a 35-percent loss in one year, then your asset allocation should be 100 percent in equities, and you should expect a 13.7 percent return over the 30-year period. Remember that the only way that you can obtain higher returns over the long haul is to be willing to accept greater risk. Obviously, for those of us who are longer in the tooth, more conservatism may be better. Be sure to check with your own financial adviser.

Believe it or not, some consumers think that they have three days to in which to change their minds in order to return a new vehicle and receive their monies back. Actually, that is not the case, since this 72-hour “cooling off” period only applies to items that were purchased in your home or away from the seller’s usual place of business. The only way you can return an automobile and receive all of your money back is contingent on whether or the vehicle falls under the “lemon law.” Check with the South Carolina consumer protection agency.

Got a financial planning question for Greg? You may e-mail him at greg@lifesolutionsonline.net.

Greg Roberts is a certified financial planner with 35 years of financial and estate planning experience.

Poor Customer Service from Automobile Dealerships

 Boucher Volkswagen Promise (written on the large selection of service receipts we now “own” on our VW Jetta):  We are DIFFERENT, ORIGINAL, HONEST.  We sell cars that offer a unique combination of German Engineering, Safety, Driving Enjoyment and Value.  We are FRIENDLY and APPROACHABLE.  There is a segment of the public that admires our character.  We are different and proud of it!

The service manager at Boucher Volkwagen said we should go right ahead and contact the Media about the issues we have with his dealership and their poor customer service.  So, that’s what we are doing and will do in the future.  Wonder where I would be if I used a statement like that at my work with my customers.

I’m proud of my German heritage; not of my VW Jetta.  This car has been a problem since the day we purchased it.  After numerous attempts to get one issue fixed, a recall miraculously came up that resulted in a fix – finally.  Now, another situation has arisen – we have had the car in over the past few months six times – each time they either charge us a hefty amount saying they solved the problem – they never do.  My husband has done alot of research and knows a little about cars and how they function.  He makes suggestions; tells the dealership that what they are suggesting is not the problem and why and yet they just blow him off.  We are very good at maintaining our vehicles inside/outside and mechanically as we expect to get a good amount of years out of it if we do good maintenance.  We have very low mileage – vehicle looks like new.  We cannot sell it to someone else because it isn’t running right and we just don’t do things like that.  We are frustrated and upset that this dealership just will NOT fix the problem and continue to ignore what we are saying to them.  

I will be writing to the Consumer Protection Agency in Wisconsin and the BBB; however, both my husband and I are frustrated at the way that consumers are treated in some instances nowadays.  If I did this with my customers at my work, I’d be in the unemployment line.

I have little faith in most attorneys as they are out for themselves and would be more of an expense that we can take on at this time.  I want to say that there are some good attorneys out there.  

I know that others have had similar problems – what’s a consumer to do?  All we want is the car fixed so we can move on.  We like the car and like to drive it when it is running right.  

We’ve had several cars during our marriage – Toyotas, Chevys, GMCs,  Nissans, and so on – no problems.  Had a problem with a AMC many years ago and sued under the Lemon Law – won but didn’t make out that well after attorney’s fees reduced the settlement.  Not worth the hassles.

We encourage your comments but will strive to remove discussion that contains personal attacks, racial slurs, profanity or other inappropriate material as outlined in our guidelines. We post-moderate comments on most content, but may choose to pre-moderate some comments so please be patient if you don’t see yours appear right way. We also ask for your help by reporting comments you think are inappropriate.

Urine Smell 'Unbearable' In Newly Purchased Washington Twp. Home

linkemail

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, Pa. — A Washington Township couple claims they unknowingly purchased a home that smells of urine throughout.

Jim Gilmore said he and his wife closed on the home about a year ago, but weren’t told about a major problem.

Gilmore said the stench of urine in the home is so bad, he and his wife have not been able to live in it. When he first visited the home, Gilmore said the smell was masked by the smell of wood stain.

“This is the bathroom. All these cupboards and shelves were soaked with urine. Every shelf in this house was soaked,” Gilmore said.

The Gilmores said they tried to fix the problem by redoing the floors and painting the ceilings, but soon after white spots began to appear on the floor.

Gilmore claims the sellers didn’t tell him a mentally disabled man lived there for years and urinated on almost everything. Gilmore said he’s spent about $30,000 on trying to fix the issue, but the smell will not go away.

“Where’s the lemon law to help somebody like me? If you buy a car and it’s screwed up, you get three chances to take it back. I can’t live in this,” said Gilmore.

Channel 11’s Courtney Brennan reports that her attempts to contact the sellers of the home and the real estate agent were not returned.



E-Mail Newsletter:
Get The Latest News Sent To Your E-Mail!


Mobile:
Get WPXI Headlines On Your Phone, iPhone, More

RSS:
Add Us To Your Page!

Copyright 2011 by WPXI.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Urine Smell 'Unbearable' In Newly Purchased Washington Twp. Home

linkemail

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, Pa. — A Washington Township couple claims they unknowingly purchased a home that smells of urine throughout.

Jim Gilmore said he and his wife closed on the home about a year ago, but weren’t told about a major problem.

Gilmore said the stench of urine in the home is so bad, he and his wife have not been able to live in it. When he first visited the home, Gilmore said the smell was masked by the smell of wood stain.

“This is the bathroom. All these cupboards and shelves were soaked with urine. Every shelf in this house was soaked,” Gilmore said.

The Gilmores said they tried to fix the problem by redoing the floors and painting the ceilings, but soon after white spots began to appear on the floor.

Gilmore claims the sellers didn’t tell him a mentally disabled man lived there for years and urinated on almost everything. Gilmore said he’s spent about $30,000 on trying to fix the issue, but the smell will not go away.

“Where’s the lemon law to help somebody like me? If you buy a car and it’s screwed up, you get three chances to take it back. I can’t live in this,” said Gilmore.

Channel 11’s Courtney Brennan reports that her attempts to contact the sellers of the home and the real estate agent were not returned.



E-Mail Newsletter:
Get The Latest News Sent To Your E-Mail!


Mobile:
Get WPXI Headlines On Your Phone, iPhone, More

RSS:
Add Us To Your Page!

Copyright 2011 by WPXI.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

ELECTRIC VEHICLE TAX INCENTIVES, CRACKDOWN ON AUTHORITY SALARIES & BENEFITS & MORE HELP FOR NEW JERSEY HORSE RACING TOP ASSEMBLY AGENDA

*** THURSDAY ADVISORY ***

ELECTRIC VEHICLE TAX INCENTIVES, CRACKDOWN ON AUTHORITY SALARIES BENEFITS MORE HELP FOR NEW JERSEY HORSE RACING TOP ASSEMBLY AGENDA

Red Tape Cutting, Tightening Immunization Exemptions, Consumer Protections Also on Tap

(TRENTON) – Legislation to promote the purchasing of electric cars and charging stations through tax credits, crackdown on salaries and benefits at state and local authorities, streamline burdensome regulations to help businesses and help boost the horse racing industry and tighten immunization exemptions top Thursday’s Assembly voting session agenda.

The session is slated to begin at 1 p.m. with a Black History Month ceremony. It will be streamed live at http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/media/live_audio.asp.

Highlights include:

• Legislation (A-3650-3651) sponsored by Assembly Democrats Connie Wagner (D-Bergen), Craig J. Coughlin (D-Middlesex), Gilbert “Whip” Wilson and Angel Fuentes (D-Camden/Gloucester), Daniel R. Benson and Wayne DeAngelo (both D-Mercer/Middlesex), Valerie Vainieri Huttle (D-Bergen), Kevin J. Ryan (D-Essex) to provide corporate and gross income tax credits for the purchase of electric vehicles and charging stations.

• Legislation (A-2505) sponsored by Nellie Pou (D-Passaic/Bergen), Paul Moriarty (D-Gloucester/Camden) and Gordon Johnson (B-Bergen) to restrict the salaries and benefits at state and local authorities.

• Legislation (A-2721-2722) sponsored by John Burzichelli (D-Gloucester/Salem/Cumberland), Annette Quijano (D-Union) and Ralph Caputo (D-Essex) to continue helping New Jersey’s economy by cutting back on burdensome business regulations.

• Legislation (A-2051) sponsored by DeAngelo and Ruben J. Ramos Jr. (D-Hudson) to invalidate any consumer contract that requires a consumer to waive the right to file a consumer complaint.

• Legislation (A-2513-3511-3710) to continue efforts to boost New Jersey’s horse racing industry. They’re sponsored by Burzichelli, Wagner, Vainieri Huttle and John F. McKeon (D-Essex).

• A resolution (ACR-157) sponsored by Herb Conaway, M.D. (D-Camden/Burlington) and Burzichelli to require the state to tighten regulations granting immunization exemptions to school children.

• Legislation (A-444) sponsored by Speaker Pro Tempore Jerry Green (D-Union/Middlesex/Somerset) to disqualify school board members for crime convictions and require them to undergo background checks.

• Legislation (A-2592) sponsored by John Wisniewski (D-Middlesex), Coughlin and Vincent Prieto (D-Hudson/Bergen) to create a next-of-kin program for use after motor vehicle accidents.

• A bill (A-3468) sponsored by Peter J. Barnes III (D-Middlesex), L. Grace Spencer (D-Essex) and Vainieri Huttle to establish a civil cause of action for gender-motivated violence.

• Legislation (A-3468) sponsored by Nelson Albano and Matthew W. Milam (both D-Atlantic-Cape May-Cumberland), Burzichelli and Celeste Riley (D-Gloucester/Salem/Cumberland) to extend lemon law protections to farm equipment.

• Legislation (A-2571) sponsored by Joan M. Quigley (D-Hudson/Bergen), Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-Mercer) and Spencer to recognize three Indian tribes in New Jersey.

The complete agenda can be found at: http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/legislativepub/leg….

On the Net:
The Assembly Democratic Office Web site
NJ Assembly Dems on YouTube
NJ Assembly Dems on Vimeo
NJ Assembly Dems on Facebook
NJ Assembly Dems on Twitter
NJ Assembly Dems e-mail alerts

 

Assembly To Vote On Bills Promoting Electric Cars, Tightening Immunization …

TRENTON – The state Assembly is scheduled to vote on bills that would promote electric car purchases, tighten immunization exceptions and restrict salaries and benefits at local and state authorities on Thursday.

The session is slated to begin at 1 p.m. with a Black History Month ceremony. It will be streamed live at http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/media/live_audio.asp.

Article continues beneath advertisement

The Assembly will vote on two bills that would extend corporate and income tax credits to promote the purchase of electric vehicles and charging stations.

“We should be doing all we can to promote electric car usage and purchases in New Jersey,” said Assemblyman Craig J. Coughlin (D-Middlesex). “These bills aren’t a cure-all, but they’re certainly a great stride toward making New Jersey a friendly state for electric cars, and that’s a great thing.”

The state Office of Legislative Services estimate that A-3651 will cost the state $34.7 million over three years to provide tax credits to customers buying electric cars. A-3650 will cost an estimated $1.4 million over three years to provide tax credits for purchasing and installing charging stations.

A resolution sponsored by Assemblymen Herb Conaway, M.D. (D-Camden) and John Burzichelli (D-Gloucester) would make it more difficult for parents to claim a religious exemption to avoid having their children vaccinated if it is approved.

“By creating more exemptions, we expose more children to public health risks, as well as those with whom they come in contact with at school, at home and in the community, putting all of them at risk of contracting serious communicable diseases,” said Burzichelli.

Also on the agenda is a bill already approved by the state Senate that would prevent the executive director of any authority from having a higher salary than the governor and any authority employee from being paid more than a state cabinet officer without the approval of the Local Finance Board or state treasurer. It would also limit the number of holidays and cap accumulated sick time.

“This much-needed bill would align the salaries and benefits at the independent state authorities and local authorities with those of full-time state employees, helping put an end to the abuses that have become far too frequent,” said Assemblywoman Nelli Pou (D-Passaic).

Also on the agenda are bills intended to help the state’s horse racing industry, reduce business regulations, disqualify school board members from serving if they’ve been convicted of crimes and to extend “lemon law” protections to farm equipment.

The complete agenda can be found at: http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/legislativepub/legcal.asp

This entry was posted
on Thursday, February 17th, 2011 at 9:01 am and is filed under Featured, State News.
You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.