After zero to $60M, Connecticut lemon law gets tuneup – CTPost – CT Post

  • In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles. Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick / Stamford Advocate

  • In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles.



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In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles. less
In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or … more


Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick

After zero to $60M, Connecticut lemon law gets tuneup

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The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection issued a newly revised handbook on the state’s “lemon law” governing sales of defective vehicles, with DCP stating the law has resulted in consumers getting refunds or replacement cars valued at $60 million since the law’s enactment.

Under Connecticut’s lemon law, vehicle and motorcycle buyers can force dealers into arbitration if unable to get satisfactory repairs of problems that surface within two years or 24,000 miles of vehicle use that are not the fault of the owner. DCP lists the outcome of arbitration cases publicly online.


Information on Connecticut’s lemon law is available online at www.ct.gov/dcp/lemon or by calling (860) 713-6120.

Alex.Soule@scni.com; 203-842-2545; www.twitter.com/casoulman

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What Happens If Your Used Car Is a Lemon? – RoadandTrack.com (blog)

In the past, I’ve warned you about buying used cars “as-is” and pointed out how doing so can leave you without a remedy if the car is defective. But what about used cars sold with warranties? If those turn out to be lemons what can the buyers do?

While most used cars sold in America are sold as-is, some used cars sold by dealers are sold with warranties. For the purposes of this discussion, I am not talking about late model cars which come with the remainders of the first owner’s new car factory warranty. I’m talking about a five-year-old three-owner car with 100,000 miles on the clock. Suppose you buy that car from a dealer who offers it with a 3-month/3,000 mile warranty. And it turns out to be defective.

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This is a call I get all too often. But the good news is that you are better off than the person who bought the same car as-is.

First, the state Lemon Law will not apply because the car is not new and I don’t know of any state lemon laws that extend coverage out that far beyond the first owner. The warranty is what you will be relying upon here.

Read the warranty–or whatever writing the dealer gave you that described it–and make sure what you are experiencing is covered. Many dealer warranties are severely limited–like to engine and transmission only, or to “the drivetrain.” If it is covered, bring the car to the dealer immediately since that clock is ticking so fast on this short warranty. Explain to them what is wrong and ask that it be fixed.

Many people get frustrated quite early on when working with a dealer in a situation like this. Often, it is because they were told that the vehicle had been “inspected” or “checked out” before the sale and this early malfunction appears to show the car was not carefully inspected. Keep your cool. Remember that the statements of the seller are not what you are relying on since they are most likely unenforceable to begin with. You are seeking repairs under warranty.

Document your interaction with the dealer. If they perform repairs on your car make sure they give you paperwork indicating what was done. Then, take the car back and see if it’s fixed. If it is, then you got what you bargained for. If it is not, take it back again. Lather, rinse, repeat.

I have heard from consumers in two camps at this point. Some who got their cars fixed but were wary about how much longer they’d last. Well, if they make it beyond the warranty limitations, then you pretty much got what you bargained for. Others, who bought cars that could not be fixed under the warranty, or simply weren’t. The car needed a new engine block and the dealer refused to replace it because the repair was too expensive.

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THAT is when you might have a case against a dealer for a used car. The refusal to honor the warranty is a breach of warranty, and that is actionable – something you can sue someone for – pretty much everywhere. But to get there, you have to go through the hoops first. Give the seller the opportunity to do the repairs and see what happens.


Steve Lehto is a writer and attorney from Michigan. He specializes in Lemon Law and frequently writes about cars and the law. His most recent books include Preston Tucker and His Battle to Build the Car of Tomorrow, and Dodge Daytona and Plymouth Superbird: Design, Development, Production and Competition. He also has a podcast where he talks about these things

This article was not written by Michigan Lemon Law.
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Written by: Steve Lehto

California Consumer Protection Firm Lemon Law Aid Welcomes New Associate Attorney – Digital Journal

“Lemon Law Aid’s New Associate Attorney Josh Finkelstein”

Lemon Law Aid is pleased to announce the addition of new associate attorney Josh Finkelstein to the firm.

Pasadena, CA – October 11th, 2017 – Lemon Law Aid is pleased to announce the addition of new associate attorney Josh Finkelstein to the firm. Mr. Finkelstein focuses his practice on lemon law and dealer fraud matters.

Prior to joining Lemon Law Aid, Mr. Finkelstein worked in personal injury law and mass tort litigation, representing clients in wrongful death cases and motor vehicle accidents. He most recently served as in-house counsel for a consumer goods startup in Orange County California. He graduated from UC Hastings College of the Law, is a member of the State Bar of California and Orange County Bar Association.

Based in Los Angeles County and founded by a former auto industry defense attorney, Lemon Law Aid was created to provide consumers with the same level of representation available to the auto industry. Lemon Law Aid’s attorneys excel at protecting consumer rights and getting consumers the justice they deserve and the protection the law entitles them to. The firm works with clients from all over California and strives to to provideeffective and honest representation.

Lemon Law Aid is continuing to grow into one of California’s premier consumer protection law firms, and the addition of Josh will greatly assist Lemon Law Aid’s clients going forward. Lemon Law Aid founder Joseph Kaufman says “We are proud to have Josh join our team. He’s a zealous advocate who has a demonstrated ability to protect and preserve consumer rights.”

Lemon Law Aid specializes in California lemon law for cars, motorcycles, RV, boat and consumer goods. Information about Lemon Law Aid’s practice areas can be found at http://www.lemonlawaid.com/practice-areas/.

To find out how Lemon Law Aid can help you or to request a free consultation, call 626-219-1648 or go to www.LemonLawAid.com.

Media Contact
Company Name: Lemon Law Aid, Inc.
Contact Person: Joseph Kaufman
Email: info@lemonlawaid.com
Phone: 626-219-1648
Address:117 E. Colorado Blvd., Suite 600
City: Pasadena
State: CA
Country: United States
Website: http://www.lemonlawaid.com/

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After zero to $60M, Connecticut lemon law gets tuneup – CT Post

  • In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles. Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick / Stamford Advocate

  • In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles.



Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick

Image 1of/1

Caption

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Image 1 of 1

In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles. less
In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or … more


Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick

After zero to $60M, Connecticut lemon law gets tuneup

Back to Gallery


The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection issued a newly revised handbook on the state’s “lemon law” governing sales of defective vehicles, with DCP stating the law has resulted in consumers getting refunds or replacement cars valued at $60 million since the law’s enactment.

Under Connecticut’s lemon law, vehicle and motorcycle buyers can force dealers into arbitration if unable to get satisfactory repairs of problems that surface within two years or 24,000 miles of vehicle use that are not the fault of the owner. DCP lists the outcome of arbitration cases publicly online.


Information on Connecticut’s lemon law is available online at www.ct.gov/dcp/lemon or by calling (860) 713-6120.

Alex.Soule@scni.com; 203-842-2545; www.twitter.com/casoulman

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Candidates For District Attorney Spar At Keystone Forum – Cleveland American

 The Keystone Peninsula Property Owners Association welcomed members, community friends and guest speakers, Rex Duncan and Jeff Jones to its monthly meeting at the Westport Community Center Monday, Oct. 11.

 The meeting served as a forum/debate between Duncan and Jones, candidates for the office of District Attorney for Pawnee and Osage counties. Acting as moderator for the candidate forum program was guest Rusty Ferguson, publisher and editor of The Cleveland American, who came fully prepared with questions for the candidates to answer while the audience wrote their questions on cards to be discussed later.

 Each candidate was given five minutes for their opening statement.  Jones, First Assistant District Attorney for Osage and Pawnee Counties, was given the floor first.  He introduced his wife, Teri, of 30 years, and mentioned their two married daughters, one granddaughter and expected grandson.

 Jones graduated from Skiatook High School in 1976 before going on to Oklahoma State University where he graduated with two business degrees in 1980.  He paid his way through law school working as a UPS driver and graduated from the University of Tulsa College of Law in 1999 with a Juris Doctor degree.  He has worked for the District Attorney’s office since 2002, and has worked as First Assistant District Attorney since 2006.

 He thanked the audience for voting for the new Pawnee County Jail explaining it was much needed as the current jail is very inadequate and antiquated. He praised law enforcement officers for making a difference in the work load in the District Attorney’s office by their keeping the crime rate down, describing it as the lowest in all of Oklahoma’s counties.However, there were 548 warrants for bogus check writers outstanding in Pawnee County and 671 in Osage County.

 He concluded his opening remarks by saying he had been prosecuting criminals for seven years and “doing my job every day.”

 Duncan introduced his wife, Amy, and said they had three small daughters at home.  He said he decided to step down from his position as State Representative of District 35 when he heard that Larry Stuart, Osage and Pawnee County District Attorney of 32 years, was retiring.

 Duncan graduated from Oklahoma University and then went on to graduate from Oklahoma City University Law School.  He has more than 22 years of legal experience and has worked as a prosecutor.  For the past six years he has been a voice for law enforcement and consumers in the Oklahoma Legislature as well

as serving his nation with honor and integrity in the military. He is currently a Colonel  in the Oklahoma Army National Guard and is a commander of the 189th Regiment.

 He feels that the crime rate is not as low as it should be and believes a new District Attorney will make a difference and give criminals the message that Pawnee and Osage counties are not a “crime sanctuary.”  He noted that he has prosecuted lawbreakers in 19 jury trials and won 17 of those.

 In answer to Ferguson’s question regarding, if elected, how they would split their time between the two counties, both men agreed that since Osage County was the larger of the two counties that they would work three days in the Pawhuska office there and  then two days in Pawnee.

 “How seriously would you take punishing crimes against children?” Ferguson asked.

 “To the max,” Jones replied. 

 “Harsh, strong and harsh,” Duncan answered. He went on to add that if he had his druthers, the first offense against children would be life without parole and the second conviction for raping a child would be the death penalty.

 Both men shed considerable light on State Question 744 regarding the State of Oklahoma providing money to support common schools.  Duncan said this piece of legislation, if passed, will cost the taxpayers $1 billion annually and the cost would go up, never down, each succeeding year.  There would be serious cut-backs in other areas of state-funded government, such as roads and bridges and other public services such as the judicial system and/or increase taxes to pay for it.

 “Bad idea,” they both agreed.

 “As DA, what would you do with drunk drivers?” the moderator inquired.  Both agreed that when a person has reached a felony DUI status, they have already had several arrests, therefore, the felon would now do jail time.

  Duncan added that he had doubled the penalty for repeat offenders, now making it 20 years.

 Ferguson asked the candidates to comment on State Question 755.

  As author of SQ 755, Duncan said, “Sharia Law is a competing constitution against each state’s constitution, and we would lose our courts to political law if we allowed it.  This is already happening in America in New Jersey.” 

 Jones said, “Vote yes for 755. We don’t need international laws in our courts.  Just Oklahoma laws.”

 Next, the moderator asked both candidates to talk about SQ 751, making English the official language in Oklahoma.

 Duncan explained that well over 200 languages could be demanded if English were not the official language and that would call for that many forms and books to be printed plus that many interpreters hired.  The cost would be $50,000 per language for the driver’s license manual alone.  Jones heartily agreed, “English, and only English,” he said.

 Talking about the good values of a grand jury, the question came up regarding current news of deciding if Pawnee County Sheriff Roger Price and County Commission Dale Vance should be paid while under suspension. Jones said this had never come up before in the history of the county, therefore, a ruling from the Attorney General’s office was being requested.  Duncan added, “Innocent until proven guilty.”

 When asked to elaborate on illegal immigrants, Jones said they were a big problem and could actually fill the jail.  Duncan  said, “You do not want to make illegal immigrants U.S. citizens.”

 Former Pawnee County Commissioner, Bill Hickson, now a member of the  Silver-Headed Legislature, asked, “What can be done for our seniors?”  to which Duncan replied, “To the monsters who prey on seniors and those in nursing homes, harsh severe punishment.”

 Jones said  Lindsey Haney in the DHS Office in Pawnee was excellent in handling senior situations and that Pawnee County took better care of seniors than Osage County.

 In his closing remarks, Duncan said, “The DA’s office is described as a tough man’s contest.  He has to be aggressive.  I will go after those criminals who are making it costly to live in our counties.  I took on Sharia Law.  I took on GM, Ford and Toyota and worked for five years to put the Lemon Law into effect. Now the consumer has protection from defective automobiles.  I have more jury trial experience.  I have a new set of eyes and ears for this office.  I ask for your vote November 2.”

 Jones talked about his ability to prosecute.  “I’ve worked every level in the DA’s office and I’ve worked many dockets:  felony, misdemeanor, deprived, delinquent and traffic.  The question should now be, “What will the new DA do for Osage/Pawnee Counties?”  I’m going to continue doing what I’ve started. (1.) I started the Cleveland School Truancy Board.  Kids who are not in school are out committing crimes.  If students are missing too many school days, then a letter is sent to the parents and they have to appear before the Truancy Board with their children. The Board is made up with someone from DHS, the DA’s office, Juvenile Authorities and school officials.  (2) Pawnee County has a  domestic violence problem that needs addressing.  The DA’s office is coordinating with police officers, victims’ advocates and counselors from beginning to throughout the trial. (3)  I’ve also been out in the community.  I’ve been to the Cleveland Area Hospital to talk to them about reporting violent crimes.  (4) One thing that other DA offices have that I will try to get is grants for a victim/witness coordinator. Right now we have to borrow one and pay for them when we have a trial in Pawnee County.  (5)  Changes are coming and it will not be business as usual.  Vote for me on November 2. Thank you.”

 KPPOA President Glenn Maharrey thanked both candidates for their remarks, Ferguson for moderating and the “full house” audience for coming. Many stayed long after the meeting was adjourned to speak personally to the candidates and to Ferguson.

 Following a 6 p.m. potluck, the November 8 guest speaker will be Cleveland Postmistress, Tena Moody, who is returning again to speak  regarding the new street addresses. Those who missed her in June, now have one more opportunity to come and get questions answered.  The meeting will start at 7:00 p.m. and the public is welcomed.

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Business Briefs: Joining the board, Ring's End buys lumber yard… – The Darien News


Published 12:00 am, Sunday, October 8, 2017



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Business Briefs: Joining the board, Ring’s End buys lumber yard…

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Trinity College has added Darien resident Justin Maccarone Jr. to its board of trustees. Maccarone is a 1981 graduate of the college, later earning an MBA from Columbia University.

Maccarone is managing director of strategic development for Stamford-based Tradition Energy, and previously worked for the private equity arm of UBS.

Maccarone is president of the executive committee of Trinity’s alumni association.


Darien-based Ring’s End acquired Tuxis Lumber of Madison, the company’s eighth lumberyard. Other area locations include Bethel and Wilton.

Ring’s End has showrooms and paint centers in Fairfield, Trumbull and Westport, as well as commercial plants in Milford and Stratford.

Ring’s End did not state transaction terms with the owners of Tuxis Lumber, which has been in business in 1961.

William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty agent Bryan Morris has been named the 2017 Realtor of the Year by the Darien Board of Realtors for his commitment to service as president of both the Darien Board and Multiple Listing Service.

In 2014, Morris was ranked number two in units sold in the Darien office; he then rose to first place in that category in 2015 and 2016.

Whole Foods Market disclosed it became aware recently of unauthorized access of payment card information used at certain full-service restaurants and taprooms within some of its 470 stores, with its checkout systems in grocery aisles not believed to be compromised.

Whole Foods did not provide dates and locations of any breaches, saying it is working with law enforcement in investigating the incidents. Whole Foods’ nearby locations include Darien, Fairfield and Westport.

Two doctors have opened offices in Darien: one a concierge medicine practice, the other a family therapy office.

An internal medicine practitioner for almost two decades, Dr. Amanda Collins-Baine started a concierge medical practice, Darien Signature Health, providing full primary care within a highly personalized experience for patients.

Darien Signature Health is located at 53 Old Kings Highway North, serving patients in the Darien, Stamford and Greenwich communities.

Collins-Baine, board certified in internal medicine, has been in practice since 2001. Prior to launching her personalized care practice, Collins-Baine provided care at the Internal Medicine Associates of Darien and Stamford Health Medical Group and also served on the board of Stamford Health Medical Group.

She earned her medical degree from St. George’s University School of Medicine and completed her residency at Stamford Hospital, where she subsequently was appointed chief medical resident.

Kimberly Ross Johnson, a 1984 graduate of Darien High School, opened a practice in town providing mental health services to individuals, children, adolescents and families.

A licensed marriage and family therapist, she received her undergraduate degree from the University of Vermont and her master’s degree from Fairfield University in 2013. Johnson specializes in adolescent, child and individual therapy including anxiety, depression, OCD, and family conflict.

Her new office is located at 50 Old Kings Highway North, Suite 204.

The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection issued a newly-revised handbook on the state’s “lemon law” governing sales of defective vehicles. Under the law, vehicle and motorcycle buyers can force dealers into arbitration if unable to get satisfactory repairs of problems that surface within two years or 24,000 miles of vehicle use.

Information is available online atct.gov/dcp/lemon or by calling 860-713-6120.

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Business Briefs: Joining the board, Ring's End buys lumber yard… – The Darien News


Published 12:00 am, Sunday, October 8, 2017



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Johnson


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Morris

Morris


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Maccarone

Maccarone


Photo: /

Business Briefs: Joining the board, Ring’s End buys lumber yard…

Back to Gallery


Trinity College has added Darien resident Justin Maccarone Jr. to its board of trustees. Maccarone is a 1981 graduate of the college, later earning an MBA from Columbia University.

Maccarone is managing director of strategic development for Stamford-based Tradition Energy, and previously worked for the private equity arm of UBS.

Maccarone is president of the executive committee of Trinity’s alumni association.


Darien-based Ring’s End acquired Tuxis Lumber of Madison, the company’s eighth lumberyard. Other area locations include Bethel and Wilton.

Ring’s End has showrooms and paint centers in Fairfield, Trumbull and Westport, as well as commercial plants in Milford and Stratford.

Ring’s End did not state transaction terms with the owners of Tuxis Lumber, which has been in business in 1961.

William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty agent Bryan Morris has been named the 2017 Realtor of the Year by the Darien Board of Realtors for his commitment to service as president of both the Darien Board and Multiple Listing Service.

In 2014, Morris was ranked number two in units sold in the Darien office; he then rose to first place in that category in 2015 and 2016.

Whole Foods Market disclosed it became aware recently of unauthorized access of payment card information used at certain full-service restaurants and taprooms within some of its 470 stores, with its checkout systems in grocery aisles not believed to be compromised.

Whole Foods did not provide dates and locations of any breaches, saying it is working with law enforcement in investigating the incidents. Whole Foods’ nearby locations include Darien, Fairfield and Westport.

Two doctors have opened offices in Darien: one a concierge medicine practice, the other a family therapy office.

An internal medicine practitioner for almost two decades, Dr. Amanda Collins-Baine started a concierge medical practice, Darien Signature Health, providing full primary care within a highly personalized experience for patients.

Darien Signature Health is located at 53 Old Kings Highway North, serving patients in the Darien, Stamford and Greenwich communities.

Collins-Baine, board certified in internal medicine, has been in practice since 2001. Prior to launching her personalized care practice, Collins-Baine provided care at the Internal Medicine Associates of Darien and Stamford Health Medical Group and also served on the board of Stamford Health Medical Group.

She earned her medical degree from St. George’s University School of Medicine and completed her residency at Stamford Hospital, where she subsequently was appointed chief medical resident.

Kimberly Ross Johnson, a 1984 graduate of Darien High School, opened a practice in town providing mental health services to individuals, children, adolescents and families.

A licensed marriage and family therapist, she received her undergraduate degree from the University of Vermont and her master’s degree from Fairfield University in 2013. Johnson specializes in adolescent, child and individual therapy including anxiety, depression, OCD, and family conflict.

Her new office is located at 50 Old Kings Highway North, Suite 204.

The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection issued a newly-revised handbook on the state’s “lemon law” governing sales of defective vehicles. Under the law, vehicle and motorcycle buyers can force dealers into arbitration if unable to get satisfactory repairs of problems that surface within two years or 24,000 miles of vehicle use.

Information is available online atct.gov/dcp/lemon or by calling 860-713-6120.

This article was not written by Michigan Lemon Law.
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After zero to $60M, Connecticut lemon law gets tuneup – Connecticut … – CT Post

  • In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles. Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick / Stamford Advocate

  • In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles.



Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick

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In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles. less
In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or … more


Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick

After zero to $60M, Connecticut lemon law gets tuneup

Back to Gallery


The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection issued a newly revised handbook on the state’s “lemon law” governing sales of defective vehicles, with DCP stating the law has resulted in consumers getting refunds or replacement cars valued at $60 million since the law’s enactment.

Under Connecticut’s lemon law, vehicle and motorcycle buyers can force dealers into arbitration if unable to get satisfactory repairs of problems that surface within two years or 24,000 miles of vehicle use that are not the fault of the owner. DCP lists the outcome of arbitration cases publicly online.


Information on Connecticut’s lemon law is available online at www.ct.gov/dcp/lemon or by calling (860) 713-6120.

Alex.Soule@scni.com; 203-842-2545; www.twitter.com/casoulman

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After zero to $60M, Connecticut lemon law gets tuneup – Danbury News Times

  • In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles. Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick / Stamford Advocate

  • In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles.



Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick

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In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or 24,000 miles. less
In September 2017, the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection updated its “lemon law” manual that instructs vehicle owners how to get vehicles fixed that hit problems within two years of purchase or … more


Photo: Jason Rearick / Jason Rearick

After zero to $60M, Connecticut lemon law gets tuneup

Back to Gallery


The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection issued a newly revised handbook on the state’s “lemon law” governing sales of defective vehicles, with DCP stating the law has resulted in consumers getting refunds or replacement cars valued at $60 million since the law’s enactment.

Under Connecticut’s lemon law, vehicle and motorcycle buyers can force dealers into arbitration if unable to get satisfactory repairs of problems that surface within two years or 24,000 miles of vehicle use that are not the fault of the owner. DCP lists the outcome of arbitration cases publicly online.


Information on Connecticut’s lemon law is available online at www.ct.gov/dcp/lemon or by calling (860) 713-6120.

Alex.Soule@scni.com; 203-842-2545; www.twitter.com/casoulman

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